deontology

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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
The main problem with DR was that it cannot be an agent-neutral rule and yet also give a deontological verdict in cases like Prevention.
The deontological liberalism ignore the empirical circumstances of the people's existence and try to find the conditions of possibility for a just (i.
Deontological theories are often characterized as those theories that emphasize values expressed by "right" and "wrong" in lieu of "good" and "bad.
The third form of ethical reasoning--a deontological ethics of algorithms--feels like a counterintuitive proposition.
Deontological ethics demand that one evaluate abortion's morality independently from an examination of the circumstances surrounding any particular abortion.
After establishing that the personal professional criteria of journalists were mostly based on values learnt from their socio-cultural background, the initial objective was to investigate journalists' degree of knowledge and acceptance of the deontological code of their profession.
For a deontological moral theory that addresses the world of
Here the legal system must move from quest ions of duty, represented in deontological rhetoric, to a concern for yin tie and how it might be achieved.
Although the Dalai Lama seems to justify rights ultimately on a deontological base (the special status or worth of our natural aspiration to be happy), he often refers to compassion in order to reinforce respect for such rights, for instance, when he says, "One aspect of compassion is to respect others' rights" (Healing 5).
The TPI was designed such that a therapist holding Becoming, Collectivist, Deontological, Voluntarist, and Aristotelian positions get higher scores on these poles of each factor/dimension.
Of interest to philosophers, in particular, is Overall's dismissal of standard deontological arguments (duty-for-duty's sake arguments) and utilitarian arguments (the-greatest-good-for-the-greatest-number-of-people arguments) for having children.