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denial

 [dĕ-ni´al]
in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is denied and kept out of conscious awareness. By keeping the stressors out of consciousness, they are prevented from causing anxiety.
ineffective denial a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as denial that is detrimental to health when a person makes a conscious or unconscious attempt to disavow the meaning or even the knowledge of an event in order to reduce anxiety or fear.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl),
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
Synonym(s): negation
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]

denial

/de·ni·al/ (dĭ-ni´il) in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is kept out of conscious awareness.

denial

(dĭ-nī′əl)
n.
1. A refusal to comply with or satisfy a request.
2. Abstinence; self-denial.

denial

[dinī′əl]
Etymology: L, denegare, to negate
1 refusal or restriction of something requested, claimed, or needed, often causing physical or emotional deficiency.
2 an unconscious defense mechanism in which emotional conflict and anxiety are avoided by refusal to acknowledge those thoughts, feelings, desires, impulses, or facts that are consciously intolerable.

denial

Psychiatry A primitive–ego defense–mechanism by which a person unconsciously negates the existence of a disease or other stress-producing reality in his environment, by disavowing thoughts, feelings, wishes, needs, or external reality factors that are consciously intolerable. See In denial.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts or troublesome impulses.
Synonym(s): negation.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denego, to say no]

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]
References in periodicals archive ?
Consistent with AOD 1996-010, the IRS argued that substance-over-form doctrine should apply to deny 16 of the annual gift tax exclusions claimed.
In our opinion, actions have been taken by SUMCO Oregon in order to deny the plan participants the benefits they were originally promised under the long term incentive plan.
The Eleventh Circuit did not hold that knowledge of the underlying transaction in a deduction case was sufficient to deny relief.
Question 27: Do you admit or deny that on or about December 28, 1998, you requested, instructed, suggested to or otherwise discussed with Betty Currie that she take possession of gifts previously given to Monica Lewinsky by you?
Republicans are split over a provision, in a House-passed measure, that would allow states to deny schooling to such children.
Under the immunity arrangement, Lewinsky is prepared to testify that the president told her that he planned to deny a relationship and if they both denied it, no one would know the truth, the lawyers said.
the chief sponsor of the new welfare law, called the situation ``worrisome'' and said he had never intended to deny care to eligible immigrants.
Henders, Davies, of Selbury Street, Anfield; Daniel Lynch, 21, of Albury Close, Croxteth; and driver Warren Carter, 30, of Alundale Road, West Derby, deny murder.
Except as otherwise expressly recognized herein, Defendants deny each and every allegation contained in the Amended Complaint.
Tweed and Davis, 26, both deny raping the teenager at Tweed's east London home in the early hours of September 4 last year.
The upshot of it all is that both secularism and Islam deny any possible link between religion and reason, but for different reasons: the former because it denies reason's capacity to know anything other than what is captured by our senses, the second because it denies that God is constrained by reason.
The "Wide Wing" must deny the ball to anyone on his side of the court, while the "Tight Wing" denies the pass or forces the ballhandler to an area in the deep corner on the tight side of the court.