dentition


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Related to dentition: primary dentition

dentition

 [den-tish´un]
the teeth in the dental arch, usually referring to the natural teeth in position in the alveoli.
deciduous dentition primary teeth; see tooth.
mixed dentition the complement of teeth in the jaws after eruption of some of the permanent teeth, but before all the deciduous teeth are shed.
permanent dentition permanent teeth; see tooth.
primary dentition primary teeth; see tooth.

den·ti·tion

(den-tish'ŭn),
The natural teeth, as considered collectively, in the dental arch; may be deciduous, permanent, or mixed.
[L. dentitio, teething]

dentition

/den·ti·tion/ (den-tish´un) the teeth in the dental arch; ordinarily used to designate the natural teeth in position in their alveoli.
deciduous dentition  see under tooth.
mixed dentition  the complement of teeth in the jaws after eruption of some of the permanent teeth, but before all the deciduous teeth are shed.
permanent dentition  see under tooth.
precocious dentition  abnormally accelerated appearance of the deciduous or permanent teeth.
primary dentition  deciduous teeth; see under tooth.
retarded dentition  abnormally delayed appearance of the deciduous or permanent teeth.

dentition

(dĕn-tĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The type, number, and arrangement of a set of teeth.
2. The process of growing new teeth; teething.

dentition

[dentish′ən]
Etymology: L, dentire, to cut teeth
1 the development and eruption of the teeth. See also teething.
2 the arrangement, number, and kind of teeth as they appear in the dental arches of the mouth.
3 the teeth of an individual or species as determined by their form and arrangement. See also primary dentition, mixed dentition, natural dentition, precocious dentition, predeciduous dentition, retarded dentition, secondary dentition.
enlarge picture
Dentition

dentition

Teeth, natural or artificial. See Dental implants, Dentures, Postpermanent teeth.

den·ti·tion

(den-tish'ŭn)
The natural teeth, as considered collectively, in the dental arch; may be deciduous, permanent, or mixed.
[L. dentitio, teething]

dentition

(den-tish'un) [L. dentitio]
Enlarge picture
DENTITION
The type, number, and arrangement of teeth in the dental arch. See: illustration; teeth for illus.

diphyodont dentition

Two sets of teeth (i.e., primary and permanent, as in many mammals and humans).

heterodont dentition

A set of teeth of various shapes that may serve different functions (e.g., incisors, canines, and molars).

impaired dentition

Disruption in tooth development/eruption patterns or structural integrity of individual teeth.

mixed dentition

A set of both primary and permanent teeth, as in children between 6 and 13 years of age.

monophyodont dentition

A single set of teeth.

permanent dentition

The 32 permanent teeth, which begin to erupt at about 6 years of age in people. These are completed by the 16th year with the exception of third molars, which appear between the 18th and 25th years. The incisors are followed by the bicuspids (premolars) and the canines; then the second molars are followed by the third molars. In some individuals the third molars, although present beneath the gingiva, do not erupt. The appearance of the first molars is highly variable, but in some instances they may be the first permanent teeth to appear.
Synonym: dens permanens See: teeth

polyphyodont dentition

Several successive sets of teeth developing during a lifetime.

primary dentition

The 20 primary or deciduous teeth in children. In general, the order of eruption is two lower central incisors, 6 to 8 months; two upper central incisors, 5 to 7 months; two lower lateral incisors, 8 to 11 months; two upper lateral incisors, 7 to 10 months; four canines (cuspids), lower and upper, 16 to 20 months; four first molars, lower and upper, 10 to 16 months; four second molars, upper and lower, 20 to 30 months.

dentition

Pertaining to the teeth. The primary dentition consists of 20 teeth, the secondary, or permanent, dentition, usually 32.

dentition

the arrangement, type and number of teeth in vertebrates.

den·ti·tion

(den-tish'ŭn)
Natural teeth, considered collectively, in dental arch; may be deciduous, permanent, or mixed.
[L. dentitio, teething]

dentition (dentish´ən),

n the natural teeth in position in the dental arches.
dentition, artificial,
n the artificial substitutes for the natural dentition. See also denture.
dentition, deciduous,
n See dentition, primary.
dentition, mixed,
n the teeth in the jaws after the eruption of some of the permanent teeth but before all the primary teeth are exfoliated. This period usually begins with the eruption of the first permanent molars and ends with the exfoliation of the last primary tooth. Also called the transitional dentition. See also ugly duckling stage.
dentition, permanent (secondary dentition, permanent teeth),
n the 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to with the shedding (exfoliation) of the primary teeth.
dentition, primary,
n the 12 teeth present that erupt first and are usually replaced by the permanent teeth. This term is currently preferred over
deciduous.
dentition, prognosis of,
n an evaluation by the dental professional of the prospect of recovery from dental disease, combined with a forecast of the probability of maintaining the dentition and its associated structures in function and health.
dentition, secondary,
n See dentition, permanent.
dentition, transitional,
n See dentition, mixed.

dentition

the teeth in the dental arch; ordinarily used to designate the natural teeth in position in the alveoli.

deciduous dentition
the complement of teeth that erupt first and are later succeeded by the permanent teeth.
mixed dentition
the complement of teeth in the jaws after eruption of some of the permanent teeth, but before all the deciduous teeth are shed.
permanent dentition
the complement of teeth that normally erupt after the deciduous teeth and that are never shed except in old age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Priya & Munshi (1994) formulated a prediction chart for mixed dentition analysis, Aggarwal & Chopra (1981) formulated their own prediction tables and graphs for a section of the North Indian population.
In the bivariate analysis, we used logistic regression to estimate the strength of association between having a functional dentition and the independent variables, expressed as ORs with 95% confidence intervals; p values were considered statistically significant if lower than 0.
Factors contributing to mandibular anterior crowding in the early mixed dentition.
21) Additionally, dentition is indirectly related to the MBF, (20,21) which indicates that the force is determined by the development.
8) The bilateral type of fusion in the primary Dentition occurs less frequently than unilateral type and is about 0.
Occlusion and tooth/arch dimensions in the primary dentition of preschool Jordanian children.
The prevalence of malocclusion in the deciduous dentition was high in the present study (62.
A convenience sample of 56 kids (112 pairs of models, 2 pairs per patient) was chosen from the group of 139 schoolchildren, as they met the following inclusion criteria: good plaster model conditions, absence of air bubbles or broken teeth, the first model, obtained from each patient at initial, mixed, or intertransitional dentition stages, should have at least two central and one lower lateral incisor fully erupted, and for the second model the patient should be in the early permanent dentition stage, with canines and bicuspids fully erupted in one of the two sides of each arch (upper and lower).
Many observational studies relating to the spacing and occlusion of the primary dentition have confirmed that the occlusal characteristics vary among populations and ethnic groups.
The right dentition of the mandibular toothrow is likewise affected with a gap occurring between m1 and m2 (Fig.
These reports have completely ignored the considereable body of research showing the improved oral health-related quality-of-life outcomes that care achieves in the primary dentition.