dental sealant


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sealant

 [sēl´ant]
an agent that protects against access from the outside or leakage from the inside; called also sealer.
dental sealant a thin plastic coating put into the pits and fissures of teeth to act as a physical barrier to decay.

fis·sure seal·ant

a dental material usually made from interaction between bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate; such sealants are used to seal nonfused, noncarious pits and fissures on surfaces of teeth.
Synonym(s): dental sealant

dental sealant

[sē′lənt]
a plastic film coating that is applied to and adheres to the caries-free occlusal surfaces (chewing surfaces) of teeth to seal pits and fissures where plaque, food, and bacteria usually become trapped. The surface to be treated is isolated to ensure that it is not contaminated with saliva. It is then cleaned with a brush and pumice cleansing agent or micro-abraded, dried, and etched with a phosphoric acid solution. After the acid has been washed away and the tooth has been dried, the sealant is applied. Dental sealants are reported to reduce the incidence of caries in children's teeth by 50%. Also called pit and fissure sealant.

fis·sure seal·ant

(fishŭr sēlănt)
Dental material used to seal nonfused, noncarious pits and fissures on surfaces of teeth.
Synonym(s): dental sealant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, the rates of visits with dental sealant placement in first molars per 100 person-years increased after the policy change for all age groups, gender, and racial/ethnic groups.
Retention and effectiveness of dental sealant after 15 years.
Evaluation of school-based dental sealant programs: an updated community guide systematic economic review.
Research shows dental sealants to shield the back teeth could prevent up to 80 percent of cavities in school-aged children.
Several studies have been conducted and hundreds of articles have been written about school-based dental sealant programs.
And the combination of dental sealants and water fluoridation can prevent virtually all childhood tooth decay.
Barr adds that in her view, although point-source exposure from dental sealants might approach levels that induce health effects in rodents, "[it] is not the most significant source of exposure in humans.
The primary objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of pit and fissure sealants on first permanent molars in twelve year olds living in Puerto Rico during 1997 and to further evaluate dental sealant prevalence by 1) urban/rural and public/private school status, as well as, 2) gender.
On average, the cost for placing one dental sealant is less than half the cost of one silver filling.
of Public Health developed a manual to assist local health departments and agencies to plan, implement, and conduct dental sealant programs in school settings.
13-16) Although research shows that BPA leaches from the dental sealant into the saliva, the idea that it may be absorbed systemically into the blood or may have cumulative effects in the body should be a concern to all oral health care professionals because of the known xenoestrogenic effects of BPA.
The program offers mini-grants to local school-based and school-linked dental sealant programs targeting underserved children.