dental radiograph


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dental radiograph

Etymology: L, dens, tooth; L, radire, to shine; Gk, graphein, to record
an intraoral and extraoral x-ray film, picture, or image capture of teeth and the bone surrounding them. See also bite wing radiograph, periapical radiograph.

dental radiograph

A radiograph of dental structures made on x-ray film or stored as a digital image. The radiographs may be extraoral or intraoral. Three common types of intraoral dental images are periapical, interproximal, and occlusal radiographs.
See also: radiograph
References in periodicals archive ?
When discussing X-rays and radiation, it is important to note that dental radiographs are the images that are created when X-ray radiation passes through the mouth and strikes a film or digital sensor (these images are often called X-rays for shorthand).
Food & Drug Administration, and concurs with the ADA that dentists should order dental radiographs for patients only when necessary for diagnosis and treatment.
This article describes the clinical techniques of assembling the XCP-ORA device and of positioning it intra-orally for taking dental radiographs.
It uses detection and classification algorithms to automatically highlight possible abnormalities in dental radiographs, calculate the probability that decay is present and recommend whether a restoration should be considered.
When necessary, dental radiographs (X- rays) are taken to see how the teeth are developing and to spot hidden decay.
The update also provides information on reducing radiation exposure to patients, presents the FDA guidelines for the use of dental radiographs, and provides an overview of new X-ray technologies.
The protocol must require a written agreement with a licensed dentist providing that the dentist will be available to interpret all dental radiographs within 21 days from the date the radiograph is taken, and that the dentist will sign a radiographic review and findings form.
The accuracy of dental radiographs and visual inspection when used for demineralization (caries) detection is insufficient.
The best predictor of caries on dental radiographs is clinically visible caries in the oral cavity [Roeters et al.
expose, process, and interpret dental radiographs (x-rays);
A routine for exposing and processing films using correct technique and maintenance of equipment is critical to maximizing the information obtained from dental radiographs while minimizing patient radiation exposure.
Even though dental radiographs are the classic documents of the patient's history of dental disease, the films only tell you what has occurred, not when it occurred.