dental plaque


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to dental plaque: dental calculus

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

den·tal plaque

1. the noncalcified accumulation mainly of oral microorganisms and their products that adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged;
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque

dental plaque

den·tal plaque

(den'tăl plak)
1. The noncalcified accumulation, mainly of oral microorganisms and their products, which adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged.
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque.

dental plaque

a thin film of MICROORGANISMS embedded in a matrix of bacterial POLYSACCHARIDES and salivary polymers on the surface of teeth. See also BIOFILM.

den·tal plaque

(den'tăl plak)
1. Noncalcified accumulation mainly of oral microorganisms and their products that adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged.
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque.

dental

pertaining to the teeth.

dental abscess
see alveolar abscess, malar abscess.
dental aging
telling the age of an animal by its teeth. Significant especially in horses, cattle and sheep. See also age determination.
dental arcade
the complete array of teeth in the form of an arch. There is an upper and a lower arcade, except in ruminants where the incisor sector of the upper arcade is absent.
dental attrition
occlusal wear of a tooth, as a result of tooth to tooth contact as in mastication; physiological rather than pathological.
dental bud
the dental laminae, focal thickenings of the oral mucosae of the developing embryo, invaginate to form dental buds, the early stage of the enamel organ of the embryonic teeth.
dental caps
a condensation of the oral epithelium of the embryo's dental lamina establishes the cap stage of the developing tooth.
dental chisel
see dental hoe (below).
dental claw
an instrument used often for scaling teeth in dogs and cats. It has a thick, sickle-shaped end.
dental cyst
may be odontogenic, containing cell rests of dental tissue, or dentigerous, in which all or part of a tooth is in the cyst. Causes a local swelling of the jaw which may be visible externally. Called also dentigerous cyst.
dental discoloration
occurs as a result of medication with tetracyclines when the teeth are still in the development stage, in cases of porphyrinuria, and in small discrete lesions in association with fluorosis, again when the poisoning occurred in the pre-eruption stage. Congenital absence of dentine and enamel, as occurs in calves, causes the teeth to look pink because of their vascularity.
dental fistula
caused by the spread of alveolar periostitis or abscess. The fistula discharges from the tooth root to the side of the face below the eye, the maxillary sinus or the nasal cavity. Called also malar abscess, gum boil.
dental fluorosis
dental formula
an alphanumeric system for listing the number, type (I = incisor, C = canine, P = premolar, M = molar), and position (upper or lower) of teeth: ox and sheep 2($$\hbox{I}^0_4\ \hbox{C}_0^0\ \hbox{P}_3_^3\ \hbox{M}^3_3)= 32; horse 2(\hbox{I}_3^3\ \hbox{C}_1^1\ \hbox{P}_3^4\ \hbox{M}_3^3)=42; pig 2(\hbox{I}_3^3\ \hbox{C}_1^1 \hbox{P}_4^4\ \hbox{M}_3^3)=44; dog 2(\hbox{I}_3^3\ \hbox{C}_1^1\ \hbox{P}_4^4\ \hbox{M}_3^2)=42; cat 2(\hbox{I}_3^3\ \hbox{C}_1^1\ \hbox{P}_2^3\ \hbox{M}_1^1)=30$$.
dental fracture/fissure
usually the result of traumatic injury. Causes great discomfort, unwillingness to close the jaw or chew; often the mouth sags open and saliva is allowed to drool.
dental hoe
an instrument commonly used in veterinary dentistry. It has a broad end with a beveled edge. Called also dental chisel.
dental impaction
failure of teeth to erupt out of the alveolar bone or through the gum.
dental interlock
the deciduous upper canine teeth erupt rostral to the lower canine teeth, thereby locking the mandible from further forward growth.
dental irregular wear
dental lamina
in the embryonic oral mucosa dental lamina form as local thickenings of the epithelium; they invaginate to form dental buds, later the enamel organ. See also dental bud.
dental luxation
includes loosening of teeth through to complete avulsion.
dental malocclusion
dental mirror
a small round mirror set at an angle on one end of a handle, used in dental examinations to reflect images from intraoral surfaces.
dental occlusion
see occlusion (2).
dental pad
the thick layer of connective tissue that replaces the upper incisor teeth in the ruminant; a rostral projection of the hard palate.
dental papillary mesenchyme
the tissue which converts the dental cap stage of the growing tooth to the bell stage by covering it with enamel.
dental pellicle
a thin, acellular membrane of salivary proteins adsorbed to the enamel or cementum.
dental plaque
a dense mass of bacteria in an intercellular matrix, adhering to the surface of the tooth. It is important in that it initiates caries and periodontitis. A precursor of calculus. See also bacterial plaque.
dental pulp
the sensitive content of the cavity of the tooth carrying its nerve and blood supply.
dental records
contain the history of dental treatment given, generally recorded on diagrams or charts of the mouth, showing position of individual teeth, gingiva and occlusion.
dental resorption
may occur if the tooth pulp is traumatized, by osteoclastic action inside the tooth or outside, in the alveolar bone.
dental sac
the remains of the dental follicle at the apex of immature teeth.
dental star
the mark on the occlusal surface of a tooth, especially horse incisors, which is caused by the appearance of secondary dentine, contributed by the pulp cavity, as the tooth wears.
Enlarge picture
Dental star. By permission from Sack W, WensingCJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy,Saunders, 2002
dental tartar
see dental calculus (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
The team found direct evidence of milk consumption preserved in human dental plaque from the Bronze Age to the present day.
scraping away the dental plaque and dental calculus).
Our study results show that only milk was able to reduce acidity of dental plaque resulting from consuming sugary Froot Loops," Naval, who is currently a fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, said.
Sequencing ancient calcified dental plaque shows changes in oral microbiota with dietary shifts of the Neolithic and Industrial Revolutions.
Now the nitty-gritty: the cancers and deaths were related to the extent of patients' dental plaque measured on a plaque index.
Previous studies reported that individuals with visual impairments tended to have a larger amount of dental plaque and were at a higher risk for dental diseases than were sighted individuals (Greeley, Goldstein, & Forrester, 1976; Schembri & Fiske, 2001).
According to the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009, in Wales 10% of adults have no natural teeth, 47% of adults have tooth decay, 29% of adults don't brush their teeth twice a day and a huge 77% of adults have visible dental plaque "Poor oral health doesn't just cause problems inside the mouth," said a British Dental Health Foundation spokesperson.
The main risk factors for dental caries in children are a sugar-rich diet, incorrect feeding practices and abundant dental plaque.
Using a mouthwash also minimizes dental plaque, which accumulates everyday and is the main cause of tooth loss.
XIVIA is recognized by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to play an active role in reducing dental plaque -- contributing to caries reduction (www.
Arm & Hammer Brilliant Sparkle Gel Food and drink and poor lifestyle choices mean dental plaque is a problem for many people but this new toothpaste could finally offer a solution by effectively removing almost double the amount of plaque than other leading brands.
The link between bacteria that cause dental plaque and heart disease and strokes is well known.