dental emergency


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dental emergency

an acute disorder of oral health that requires dental and/or medical attention, including broken, loose, or evulsed teeth caused by traumas; infections and inflammations of the soft tissues of the mouth; and complications of oral surgery, such as dry tooth socket.

dental emergency

An acute condition affecting the teeth, such as inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding teeth or post-treatment complications of dental surgery. It is best treated by a dentist. Nevertheless, the primary care physician and other health care professionals must be familiar with these emergency conditions and their management.
See: table SOURCE: Adapted from Comer, RW, et al: Dental emergencies. Postgrad Med 85(3):63, Feb. 1989.
ConditionSigns and SymptomsManagement
Periodontal disease
Periodontal abscessLocalized pain; swelling of gingivae; possible sinus tract; lack of response to percussion; periodontal pocketingCurettage to establish drainage; antibiotics; warm saline rinses; soft diet; referral to dentist
PericoronitisPain and generalized soreness; inflamed operculum over partially erupted toothIrrigation; warm saline rinses; gentle massage with toothbrush; antibiotics for fever and lymphadenopathy; referral to dentist for possible tissue excision or tooth removal
Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitisGeneralized pain; bleeding gums; fetid odor; generalized gingival inflammation; necrotic tissue; loss of interdental papillae; feverGeneral débridement; daily saline rinses; hydration; referral to dentist; antibiotics if necessary; dietary recommendations; rinse twice daily with 1.2% chlorhexidine; brushing and flossing after resolution
Primary herpetic gingivostomatitis (highly infectious)Gingival ulceration; fever; punctate lesions of gingivae and possibly dorsum of tongue; buccal mucosa, floor of mouth, lips; malaise; headache; irritability; lymphadenopathyRest; diluted mouthwashes; increased fluid intake; soft diet; topical analgesics; referral to dentist
Pulpitis and periapical problems
Reversible pulpitisSharp, transient pain response to cold stimuli; recent dental restorationAnalgesics; avoidance of thermal stimuli; referral to dentist
Irreversible pulpitisSpontaneous pain; persistent or lingering pain response to thermal stimuliReferral to dentist for removal of pulp and root canal therapy or extraction of tooth
Periapical inflammationAcute pain on percussionExamination for lymph node involvement, intraoral and extraoral; swelling; fever; analgesics; referral to dentist
Periapical abscessTooth sensitive to touch; tooth mobile; fever; swelling or sinus tract; possible fever if systemic involvementThorough systemic examination; incision and drainage; antibiotics; analgesics; warm water rinses; referral to dentist
Post-treatment complications
Alveolar osteitis (dry socket)Throbbing pain 2–4 days after extractionIrrigation of extraction site; sedative dressing (eugenol); analgesics; gauze packs, bone wax, ; referral to dentist
Tooth sensitivityImbalance when teeth contact; thermal sensitivity; pain on closing mouthReferral to dentist
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Ronnie (Kim Matula) turns to an unlikely source for help as she deals with a personal dental emergency.
The subject of the public contract is the provision of medical emergency services (lps) and dental emergency services in the territory of the pilsen region in 2018 to 2020.
As such, Dr Alsaey and his colleagues at Aspetar provide oral trauma training to team physios and doctors, and have created their own custom-made dental emergency kit containing vital instruments and equipment.
Recent trends in dental emergency department visits in the United States:1997/1998 to 2007/2008.
Dental trauma (DT) of the incisors and their supporting tissues, which is one of the most challenging dental emergency situations, requires immediate assessment and management due to psychological and physical reasons (4).
He said that the conference will be contributing to a step change in providing a treatment of Maxillofacial trauma with multidisciplinary approach including Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Craniofacial Surgery, Oral Pathology, Oral Medicine, Laser Dentistry, Pediatric Dentistry, Anesthesia, Dental Management, Dental Marketing, Dental Emergency, Dental Ethics, Dental Hygiene, Cosmetic Dentistry, Community Dentistry and Behavioral Dentistry.
Failure to accept dental treatment may lead to a dental emergency, resulting in extraction of teeth under general anesthesia.
Knowing what to do during a dental emergency and getting prompt professional help greatly increase the chances that a tooth can be restored to health.
It is therefore important to increase awareness and provide necessary training and education to both general dental and medical practitioners working in the outside non teaching and specialist settings to help them deal appropriately with such dental emergency situations.
Ever experienced a dental emergency and had no idea where to go?
To fully embrace challenges regarding readiness of deployed troops, dental emergency encounters or D-DNBI incidence rates must be included in the planning process.
In studying county-level rates of emergency room visits for nontraumatic dental conditions in 29 states in 2010, researchers found that a higher density of dental providers was associated with lower rates of dental emergency room visits among Medicaid patients in rural counties, but not among Medicaid patients in urban counties, which is where the majority of dental-related emergency room visits occur.