dental anthropology

The use of teeth to compare ancient and modern man, and population groups; similarities and differences in the structure of teeth can be analyzed and their relatedness can be compared

den·tal an·thro·po·lo·gy

(den'tăl an'thrŏ-pol'ŏ-jē)
A branch of physical anthropology concerned with the origin, evolution, and development of the dentitions of primates, especially humans, and to the relationship between primates' dentition and their physical, social, and cultural relationships.

den·tal an·thro·po·lo·gy

(den'tăl an'thrŏ-pol'ŏ-jē)
Branch of physical anthropology concerned with the origin, evolution, and development of dentition of primates, especially humans, and to the relationship between primates' dentition and their physical and social relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specialists from South Australia, interstate and overseas were employed to address a range of research areas, including chronology (Pate et al 1998; Prescott et al 1983; Pretty 1986, 1988), mortuary practices (Pate 1984; Pretty 1977), demography (Prokopec 1979), population biology (Brown 1989; Pardoe 1995; Pietrusewsky 1984; Pretty et al 1998), palaeopathology (Pretty and Kricun 1989; Prokopec and Pretty 1991), dental anthropology (Smith et al 1988), forensic science (Pretty 1975), palaeodiet (Pate 2000), palaeoecology (Parker 1989; Paton 1983), palaeobotany (Boyd and Pretty 1989), soil chemistry (Pate et al 1989), and earth sciences (Firman 1984; Rogers 1990).
These have included publications in general-reader journals, particularly Archaeology Ireland, which provide overviews of certain aspects of the discipline, including dental anthropology (Power 1990), cremation (Buckley & Buckley 1999) and cemetery excavations (Buckley et al.
Dental anthropology of the female population of Marathas and Mahars of Maharashtra: an odontometric analysis, Deccan College Post-Graduate and Research Institute Bulletin 46: 151-68.
Dental anthropology, Annual Review of Anthropology 17: 99-126.