denial

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denial

 [dĕ-ni´al]
in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is denied and kept out of conscious awareness. By keeping the stressors out of consciousness, they are prevented from causing anxiety.
ineffective denial a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as denial that is detrimental to health when a person makes a conscious or unconscious attempt to disavow the meaning or even the knowledge of an event in order to reduce anxiety or fear.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl),
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
Synonym(s): negation
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]

denial

/de·ni·al/ (dĭ-ni´il) in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is kept out of conscious awareness.

denial

(dĭ-nī′əl)
n.
1. A refusal to comply with or satisfy a request.
2. Abstinence; self-denial.

denial

[dinī′əl]
Etymology: L, denegare, to negate
1 refusal or restriction of something requested, claimed, or needed, often causing physical or emotional deficiency.
2 an unconscious defense mechanism in which emotional conflict and anxiety are avoided by refusal to acknowledge those thoughts, feelings, desires, impulses, or facts that are consciously intolerable.

denial

Psychiatry A primitive–ego defense–mechanism by which a person unconsciously negates the existence of a disease or other stress-producing reality in his environment, by disavowing thoughts, feelings, wishes, needs, or external reality factors that are consciously intolerable. See In denial.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts or troublesome impulses.
Synonym(s): negation.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denego, to say no]

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]
References in periodicals archive ?
Case Managers Reorganize to Challenge Claims Denials.
ZirMed's Denial and Appeal Management solution provides a streamlined, results-focused workflow for managing denials efficiently in real time.
Chuck stated “From my career working in hospitals and revenue cycle consulting for hospitals it became evident that the 7 key components identified in the article are critical to the success of any denial management project.
4 percent, the Denial rates in California are witnessed to be on an all time high, as reported by California Department of Managed Care.
Working to reduce denials by high-volume admitting physicians.
Why are healthcare organizations trying to manage denials after they have occurred--up to and incorporating their expectation of claims denials, and subsequently looking for a software fix?
This agreement brings hope to those truly disabled insureds who may have been displaced or had their medical care cut off as a result of their claim denial.
Each denied claim can then be reviewed and, if the denial appears to be inappropriate, remedial action can be taken.
The term ``San Francisco Democrat'' has currency for a reason, because it describes a certain mold of politician, one which Pelosi (her newfound denials notwithstanding) unmistakably fits.
47) While she argues that her evidence shows that "these comparisons matter deeply to us," (48) she is not able to show why status and identity, within an economy of desire, are so deeply important to us, other than that they are socially influenced by the envy of the four-fifths of those of the upper one-fifth (49)--and despite our constant denial of that envy.
The study concluded that SAIF often issued denials before completing investigation of the claim, that it employed an unusually strict interpretation of the requirement that the worker prove compensability, and that it did not accept as conclusive medical evidence that other carriers would accept (Weeks and Harmon, 1992).
The Tax Court held that its jurisdiction is not limited to review of denials of section 6015(b) and (c) relief; there is a strong presumption administrative agency actions are subject to judicial review unless specifically precluded by statute or the action is committed to agency discretion by law.