denaturation


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denaturation

 [de-na″chur-a´shun]
a change in the usual nature of a substance, as by the addition of methanol or acetone to alcohol to render it unfit for drinking, or the change in the physical properties of a substance, such as a protein or nucleic acid, caused by heat or certain chemicals that alter tertiary structure.
protein denaturation any nonproteolytic change in the chemistry, composition, or structure of a native protein that causes it to lose some or all of its unique or specific characteristics.

de·na·tur·a·tion

(dē-na'tyū-rā'shŭn),
The process of becoming denatured.

denaturation

/de·na·tur·a·tion/ (de-na″cher-a´shun) destruction of the usual nature of a substance, as by the addition of methanol or acetone to alcohol to render it unfit for drinking, or the change in the physical properties of a substance, as a protein or nucleic acid, caused by heat or certain chemicals that alter tertiary structure.

denaturation

[dēnā′chərā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + natura, natural
1 the alteration of the basic nature or structure of a substance.
2 the process of making a potential food or beverage substance unfit for human consumption although it may still be used for other purposes, such as a solvent.

de·na·tur·a·tion

(dē-nā'chŭr-ā'shŭn)
The process of becoming denatured.

denaturation

1. Alteration in the folding pattern of a protein by heat or chemical reaction from its physiological conformation to an inactive shape.
2. In the case of DNA or RNA the conversion from a double-stranded structure to a single stranded structure, usually by heating. This is an essential stage in the POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION.

denaturation

the breakdown of the bonds forming the quaternary, tertiary and secondary structures of PROTEINS and NUCLEIC ACIDS, a process that can be caused by various agents, such as excess heat, strong acids or alkalis, organic solvents and ultrasonic vibration. In some cases, denaturation is irreversible as in, for example, the heating of egg albumen to give solid egg white. When denaturation occurs in enzymes, they are inactivated, with major effects in living organisms. Denatured nucleic acids can often be returned to their original configuration in the process of renaturation.

denaturation

1. a change in the usual nature of a substance, as by the addition of methanol or acetone to alcohol to render it unfit for drinking.
2. in proteins and nucleic acids produced by heat or certain chemicals, usually results in loss of function. In proteins, various noncovalent bonds are disrupted resulting in unfolding of the polypeptide chain; in nucleic acids hydrogen bonds between nucleotides are disrupted converting double-stranded molecules or parts of them into single-stranded forms.

protein denaturation
any nonproteolytic change in the chemistry, composition or structure of a native protein which causes it to lose some or all of its unique or specific characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
m] of an amplicon and shortening the denaturation time in PCR.
The greater potential denaturation of proteins at alkaline pH is attributed to ionization of partially buried carboxyl, phenolic and sulfhydryl groups that cause the unravelling of the polypeptide chains as they expose themselves to the aqueous environment [16].
We know that the full tertiary structures of most proteins are only marginally stable (Jaenicke 1991) and that there is an inherent rate of protein denaturation that persists in living cells.
Using the A, B and C fragments in all possible combinations as a template for four PCR reactions this study has demonstrated that HD formation occurs in absence of primers during a single denaturation step (Group II, Figure 1).
The destruction of organic compounds is occurred due to the denaturation of protein, conglomeration of lipid shell etc.
As for many polymers, the mobility of polypeptides is increased with the increase of temperature but their movement is restricted because of structure ramification, of hydrophobic interactions becoming stronger and of coagulation which follows protein denaturation [17].
85, a pH so acidic for the native enzyme that its denaturation rate in these conditions is not even accurately measurable [7].
Poultry also can remain pink after cooking because the environment in thick cuts like the breast will limit denaturation, or loss of redness, of the pigment.
To properly utilize high pressures, researchers have to understand the mechanism and kinetics of pressure-induced degradation, denaturation and inactivation of microorganisms, enzymes and nutrients.
Protein denaturation often occurs during frozen storage of untreated seafood, leading to reduced protein solubility and dehydration.
One variant can be made to form a disulfide bridge, which increases resistance to denaturation.
Current approaches such as pasteurization, solvent-detergent (SD), UV irradiation, and chemical and photochemical inactivation are not always effective against a wide spectrum of pathogens, are sometimes encumbered by process-specific deficiencies, and often result in denaturation of the biologics that they are designed to protect.