demyelination


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Related to demyelination: vasculitis, Demyelinating diseases

demyelination

 [de-mi´ĕ-lin-a´shun]
destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves. Called also demyelinization and myelinolysis.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, dē-mī'ĕ-lin-i-za'shŭn),
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts. Central demyelination occurs within the central nervous system (for example, the demyelination seen with multiple sclerosis); peripheral demyelination affects the peripheral nervous system (for example, the demyelination seen with Guillain-Barré syndrome).

demyelination

/de·my·elin·a·tion/ (de-mi″ĕ-lĭ-na´shun) destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves. Called also myelinolysis.

demyelination

[dimī′əlinā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + Gk, myelos, marrow
the process of destruction or removal of the myelin sheath from a nerve or nerve fiber.
enlarge picture
Process of demyelination

demyelination

Demyelinization Neurology A condition in which nerve trunks are not myelinated ab initio–eg, leukodystrophy or which suffer loss after myelinization has been completed–eg, myelinoclasia. See Leukodystrophy.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, -ī-zā'shŭn)
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts. Central demyelination occurs within the central nervous system (e.g., the demyelination seen with multiple sclerosis); peripheral demyelination affects the peripheral nervous system (e.g., the demyelination seen with Guillain-Barré syndrome).

demyelination

Loss of the insulating fatty sheath (myelin) of nerve fibres. This usually occurs in a patchy manner. Local areas of demyelination, in the form of ‘plaques’ which extend across large numbers of nerve fibre bundles, is the hallmark of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. Also known as demyelinization.

Demyelination

Disruption or destruction of the myelin sheath, leaving a bare nerve. Results in a slowing or stopping of impulses traveling along that nerve.

demyelination

loss or destruction of myelin sheath surrounding nerves, with associated loss of effective nerve impulse conduction; characteristic of demyelinating diseases

demyelination,

n breakdown of the myelin sheaths covering nerves and nerve fibers.
Enlarge picture
Demyelination.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, -ī-zā'shŭn, dē-mīĕ-li-nāshŭn, -lin-ī-zāshŭn)
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts.

demyelination

destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
MS lesions can and do occur within gray matter structures, such as the cerebral cortex, reflecting cortical demyelination, but these are not readily identified with conventional imaging techniques.
Demyelinating diseases were excluded on the basis of radiologic findings and a lack of demyelination.
Brain autopsy did not elucidate a cause of death; however, the cranial nerve demyelination is noteworthy.
This case had some classical features: male gender, age at presentation- third decade, brain demyelination, and peripheral neuropathy due to demyelination, leading to spastic quadri-or paraparesis.
Demyelination occuring during anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy for inflammatory arthritides.
Demyelination in Sandhoff 's disease is expected as a consequence of neuronal loss although, despite clinical and radiographic deterioration, Cho/Cr ratios have been found to remain normal.
The differential diagnosis of an abnormal localized signal intensity in the olive and pontomedullary area includes ischemic infarction, demyelination, tumor, an inflammatory process (including sarcoidosis), and focal rhomboencephalitis.
The correction of hyponatraemia carries the risk of osmotic demyelination, better known as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), although the demyelination is not necessarily confined to the pons.
Inflammation and subsequent demyelination may correlate with clinical symptoms such as relapses, functional loss, and disability (Peterson & Fujinami, 2007).
Another recently proposed connection is the relationship between apo [epsilon]4 status and the demyelination in the frontal lobe and corpus callosum, Dr.
Sections cover basic science for clinical neuroimmunology, inflammatory demyelination in the central nervous system, autoimmune diseases of the peripheral nervous system and the muscle, and disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems related to known or assumed immune system abnormalities.
Electromyography showed evidence of motor conduction consistent with demyelination.