demotivate

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demotivate

(dē-mō′tĭ-vāt)
To cause loss of incentive or motivation.
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To determine motivational profiles in sample 1, hierarchical clustering was conducted via Ward's method, using the variables intrinsic motivation, identified regulation, introjected regulation, external regulation, and demotivation.
Spend an afternoon learning self-improvements techniques, how to fight demotivation and lots more.
The two main factors topping the list of employee demotivation are low salary and job mismatch.
The best way to learn the exact cause of demotivation in an employee is to have one-on-one talk with the employee.
In the case of a degree program in Modern Languages and Translation at a university in central Spain, students are frequently asked to complete a learning log as part of their first year English classes but the experience of the instructors and professors has shown that there is some reluctance to doing the activity, with the consequence of a slight demotivation in language learning.
For others, high rate of unemployment in the country is a source of demotivation but if these people do not educate their children the issues of poverty, unemployment and even law and order will get even worse.
At times we find ourselves in an unending phase of demotivation, which can lead to depression.
39) On the other hand, a lack of respect at work place harbored dissatisfaction and demotivation which eventually led towards negative impact on the part of physicians to impart their services with dedication and sincerity.
The study shows that (1) although generally high in motivation, interpreter trainees are susceptible to demotivation; (2) trainees' Ideal Self (future self-guide) is a better motivator than Instrumentality and Avoidance; (3) factors leading to trainee demotivation could be categorized into four groups: self-, peer-, teacher-, and institute-attributed, and Teacher Factor is the most frequently cited demotivating factor by trainees.
It is noteworthy, however, that both the autonomous and controlled motivation drive behaviors, in contrast to demotivation, which represents the absence of intent or motivation (Deci & Ryan, 2008).
This mindset often results in high levels of fixed costs, demotivation, and dissent.