demotivate

(redirected from demotivation)
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demotivate

(dē-mō′tĭ-vāt)
To cause loss of incentive or motivation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pression, demotivation, empechement ou chantage, personne dans l'assistance du tribunal d'Agadir, en septembre dernier, ne saurait expliquer de maniere explicite les raisons de ce pas en arriere des deux femmes.
The 3-Delays Model (as Used for Explaining Maternal Mortality) Delay 1: Delay in decision to seek care Failure to recognize complications Acceptance of maternal death Low status of women Sociocultural barriers to seeking care: women's mobility, ability to command resources, decision-making abilities, beliefs and practices surrounding childbirth and delivery, nutrition, and education Delay 2: Delay in reaching care Poor roads, mountains, islands, rivers; poor organization Delay 3: Delay in receiving care Inadequate facilities, supplies, personnel Poor training and demotivation of personnel Lack of finances
Paradoxically, demotivation results from repetitiveness of motivation itself (see Marcus 73).
to create a safety net for disadvantaged youth and young jobseekers with no qualifications before they develop negative social consequences of their decline, ie long-term unemployment, loss of initiative, demotivation and social exclusion
We must make sure that financial savings are effective long term and beneficial and not penny pinching leading to further demotivation.
She tackled the cynicism, demotivation and lack of caring with an interactive workshop.
The demotivation to vote is a global challenge which goes beyond the EU, and comes from a lack of accountability of those forces that do change things.
Zhao's (2008) study of the life-long story of 17 teachers of English from five secondary schools reveals that aspects of motivation and demotivation co-exist in their teaching careers.
Finally, individualized follow-up guidelines regarding body fat or BMI become necessary to avoid premature demotivation in overweight youth, as well as relating programmed out-ofschool activities to everyday life, all this within a morally critical pedagogical framework that tackles, from PE, the stigmatization of obese children (Kirk, 2006).
Not easy, when Clark himself didn't know what his best team was and the demotivation of the squad has got visibly worse with every year.
It might not entirely make up for any salary reductions - but it could at least help to address any possible demotivation problems, which would not be in the interests of the law-abiding community at large.