demotivate


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demotivate

(dē-mō′tĭ-vāt)
To cause loss of incentive or motivation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The way change is introduced can often be the key to success or failure through its own power to motivate or demotivate.
Practices such as public criticism increase stress, demotivate workers and, ultimately, sabotage productivity.
SMOKING cannabis really does demotivate people, scientists have claimed.
This increases suspicions that the government wants to demotivate the workers to return home.
Danailov further expressed disappointment with party pressure on him on the part of party leadership - including Stanishev - not to reveal his decision, in order not to demotivate voters.
Labour opposition leader Nick Kemp said he was concerned that "downgrading the post of youth worker and giving them a pay cut of thousands of pounds a year will demotivate staff" and "lead to a further reduction in the quality of what's offered to the city's young people".
Speaking at the inauguration of the Summit of the Heads of State & Government of the South-East European Cooperation Process in Kishinev, Moldova, Erdogan said, "we particularly expect EU countries to carefully refrain from statements and actions that will demotivate regional countries towards accession.
A cramped work area can certainly dissatisfy and demotivate any employee; however, even if a work area is beautiful, spacious and luxurious, there may be no positive impact on your satisfaction, motivation, or productivity.
By switching to English, Welsh speakers are really doing a disservice to their monoglot compatriots and consistently demotivate them from learning the language.
It highlights that one way to demotivate is by promoting a culture of blame.
Superheads drafted in to save struggling schools demotivate staff and fail as a long-term solution, according to research published today.