demotivate


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demotivate

(dē-mō′tĭ-vāt)
To cause loss of incentive or motivation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The way change is introduced can often be the key to success or failure through its own power to motivate or demotivate.
ISLAMABAD -- Senator Dr Ashok Kumar of National Party Tuesday said that terrorists could not demotivate the nation and diminish its determination in the war against terrorism.
Not paying them the full minimum wage will demotivate younger adults.
The Englishman said: "If I was to say I want to make eight or nine changes and bring players in that would demotivate them more.
This increases suspicions that the government wants to demotivate the workers to return home.
Danailov further expressed disappointment with party pressure on him on the part of party leadership - including Stanishev - not to reveal his decision, in order not to demotivate voters.
Labour opposition leader Nick Kemp said he was concerned that "downgrading the post of youth worker and giving them a pay cut of thousands of pounds a year will demotivate staff" and "lead to a further reduction in the quality of what's offered to the city's young people".
If they don''t eat and drink properly they get dehydrated and weak, and if they are isolated, loneliness and depression can demotivate them.
This study is interested in identifying and exploring what motivate or demotivate learners from completing a self-directed online course, which have implications for designing motivating online learning environments.
A cramped work area can certainly dissatisfy and demotivate any employee; however, even if a work area is beautiful, spacious and luxurious, there may be no positive impact on your satisfaction, motivation, or productivity.