demography


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demography

 [de-mog´rah-fe]
the science dealing with populations, including matters of health, disease, births, and mortality.

de·mog·ra·phy

(dĕ-mog'ră-fē),
The study of populations, especially with reference to size, density, fertility, mortality, growth rate, age distribution, migration, and vital statistics.
[G. demos, people, + graphō, to write]

demography

/de·mog·ra·phy/ (de-mog´rah-fe) the statistical science dealing with populations, including matters of health, disease, births, and mortality.

demography

[dəmog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, demos, people, graphein, to record
the study of human populations, particularly the size, distribution, and characteristics of members of population groups. Demography is applied in studies of health problems involving ethnic groups, populations of a specific geographic region, religious groups with special dietary restrictions, and members of population groups that may represent a typical cross section of the entire nation. Compare epidemiology.

de·mog·ra·phy

(dĕ-mog'ră-fē)
The study of populations, especially with reference to size, density, fertility, mortality, growth rate, age distribution, migration, and vital statistics.
[G. demos, people, + graphō, to write]

demography

the study of human populations.

demography

statistical study of specific population groups, e.g. in relation to age, environment, geographical distribution

de·mog·ra·phy

(dĕ-mog'ră-fē)
Study of populations, especially with reference to size, density, fertility, mortality, growth rate, age distribution, migration, and vital statistics.
[G. demos, people, + graphō, to write]

demography

(dimog´rəfē),
n the study of populations, particularly the size, distribution, and characteristics of members of population groups. Demographic techniques are employed in the long-term continuing study of the residents of Framingham, Massachusetts, by the National Institutes of Health.

demography

the statistical science dealing with populations, including matters of health, disease, births and mortality. Strictly speaking the word refers to human populations but common usage includes lower animal populations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically though, Pakistan, since its inception, has been hostage to its particular mix of demography.
As we see, it is our understanding that we can capture the relationship between economy and demography in a dynamic of many factors.
I was able to talk with one of the top experts on Asian demography, who helped me formulate my dissertation research questions and provided professional contacts that played an essential role in my data collection.
In documenting the history of disciplinary claims of demography and vital statistics, Schweber examines how and .
Based on theoretical concepts such as social categorization, social identity and the similarity-attraction paradigm, researchers have argued that relational demography (the difference or similarity of a person with respect to others) is a significant predictor of various work-related attitudes (Tsui et al.
As a reference guide, I paid particular attention to the epilogue on "Needed research in demography.
The editors have not neglected the core of the held, demography Subjects related to this, too, are treated in a reader-friendly fashion.
Demography and medicine, disciplines that have studied reproduction, have not devoted special attention to analyzing the reproductive process in men.
The title signals Carroll and Hannan's emphasis on the continuity between "the theory, models and methods of general demography with those of comparable investigations of the organizational world" (p.
He adds that, in his district-leading days, he was also quite interested in books covering sociology and demography.
The authors, all university-based social scientists, clearly and succinctly present a statistical analysis of the American population in this accessible work that ponders, "Is demography destiny?
Children in two-parent families now spend more time with their mothers and fathers than children did 20 years ago, concludes a study slated to appear in DEMOGRAPHY.