dementia praecox


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dementia

 [dĕ-men´shah]
a general loss of cognitive abilities, including impairment of memory as well as one or more of the following: aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, or disturbed planning, organizing, and abstract thinking abilities. It does not include loss of intellectual functioning caused by clouding of consciousness (as in delirium), depression, or other functional mental disorder (pseudodementia). Causes include a large number of conditions, some reversible and some progressive, that result in widespread cerebral damage or dysfunction. The most common cause is Alzheimer's disease; others include cerebrovascular disease, central nervous system infection, brain trauma or tumors, vitamin deficiencies, anoxia, metabolic conditions, endocrine conditions, immune disorders, prion diseases, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, normal-pressure hydrocephalus, Huntington's chorea, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.
dementia of the Alzheimer type official name for alzheimer's disease.
Binswanger's dementia a progressive dementia of presenile onset due to demyelination of the subcortical white matter of the brain, with sclerotic changes in the blood vessels supplying it.
boxer's dementia a syndrome more serious than boxer's traumatic encephalopathy, the result of cumulative injuries to the brain in boxers; characterized by forgetfulness, slowness in thinking, dysarthric speech, and slow, uncertain movements, especially of the legs.
epileptic dementia a progressive mental and intellectual deterioration that occurs in a small fraction of cases of epilepsy; it is thought by some to be caused by degeneration of neurons resulting from circulatory disturbances during seizures.
multi-infarct dementia vascular d.
paralytic dementia (dementia paraly´tica) general paresis.
dementia prae´cox (obs.) schizophrenia.
presenile dementia name given to dementia of the Alzheimer type when it occurs in persons younger than age 65.
senile dementia name given to dementia of the Alzheimer type when it occurs in persons aged 65 or older.
substance-induced persisting dementia that resulting from exposure to or use or abuse of a substance, such as alcohol, sedatives, anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, lead, mercury, carbon monoxide, or organophosphate insecticides, but persisting long after exposure to the substance ends, usually with permanent and worsening deficits. Individual cases are named for the specific substance involved.
vascular dementia patchy deterioration of intellectual function resulting from damage by a significant cerebrovascular disorder.

de·men·ti·a prae·cox

any one of the group of psychotic disorders known as the schizophrenias; formerly used to describe schizophrenia as a single entity.
[L. precocious]

dementia praecox

(prē′kŏks′)
n.
Schizophrenia. No longer in scientific use.

dementia praecox

de·men·ti·a prae·cox

(dĕ-menshē-ă prēkoks)
One of the group of psychotic disorders known as the schizophrenias; formerly used to describe schizophrenia as a single entity.
[L. precocious]

dementia praecox

An outdated and inaccurate term for SCHIZOPHRENIA.

Patient discussion about dementia praecox

Q. how to treat schizophrenia?

A. Schizophrenia is a serious illness that should be treated with the help of a psychiatrist, because close monitoring over the medications and possible side effects is crucial. It is often treated with anti-psychotic medications, either from the older or newer generation of drugs. Some modifications are done in each patient after looking into all of the factors that take place.

Q. How can we treat a schizophrenic person? A member of my family is a schizophrenic and was diagnosed when he was 25 years old. Today at almost 60 he refuse to be treated and certain that nothing is wrong with him. The problem is me and my family feels that his illness is getting worst and we can't help him. How can we get treatment for him and if not what is the next phase we should expect to encounter?

A. although the cause for schizophrenia is not yet clear- there is a treatment for it's symptoms, and it's actually very helpful. have very good results. but it has to be accompanied by psychiatric care. you will have to convince him to go threw a therapy, talk to a good psychiatrist, ask him if he has any idea. or maybe someone here can answer that question. about what to look for, here is a very informative site about it-
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/index.shtml

Q. Am i going to get schizophrenia and what are the signs towards it? My mother is 50 years old and i knew she was bi polar and tonight i found out she has schizophrenia too from a nurse at the hospital she was sent to for going crazy out of no where tonight. I am very different from her and i am 17 years old. My dad side of the family has no disorders. How likely am i to develop schizophrenia? What are the first symptoms? Can i see signs now? and any other info.

A. Sweetheart you would not recognize a sign if it run over you. as the sickness encroaches upon your mind it also removes rational thought. you will say to your self I am not crazy there is nothing wrong with me. all the crazy Sob's around me are nuts I an not. And Honey you will believe your self. self diagnosis is a very dangerous path you are wanting to take.
Just be aware and talk to a certified psychiatrist – he’ll tell you any thing you want to know.

More discussions about dementia praecox
References in periodicals archive ?
Emil Kraepelin, Dementia Praecox and Paraphrenia (Bristol, England, 2002), p.
Make invidious comparisons between this show's aesthetic dementia praecox and the slack tedium of SITE Santa Fe's "Disparities and Deformations: Our Grotesque" (the latter's curator, Robert Storr, contributes an essay to the catalogue--can't wait for Venice
The Fieldwork was funded in part by the Committee for Research in Dementia Praecox but it is clear even before this funding was received that Mead and Bateson's research interests were well-established (pp.

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