delusory


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delusory

(dĭ-lo͞o′sə-rē, -zə-)
adj.
Tending to deceive; delusive.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is high time to release them from the clutches of their misconceived and deceitful leaders, who throughout these years, have been successful in increasing and further nourishing the delusory beliefs of the susceptible masses.
Ebbatson's reference to Konrad Lorenz is to be expected, but he also cites Theodor Adorno's and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's commentaries on bird-song, according to which bird-song offers only delusory escape from hegemonic social structures and follows pre-set patterns rather than evincing artistic spontaneity.
Choice examples can be found in the Bengali Kali tradition, where Kali's naked stance upon her husband on the cremation ground is a scandal; her lack of care for her devotee-child belies her claims to be a mother; her delusory powers keep her children in ignorance; and her created world seems bereft of justice.
Once you've got a big co-op which has become Fordist in its structure and its production processes, the attempt to have democracy within it is delusory.
The bottom line is that their delusory steps would increase tensions and complicate matters during the talks.
Health Minister Mark Drakeford may well continue to make delusory statements about the state of the Welsh NHS and continue with his playground spats with David Cameron, but the truth lies elsewhere.
The correspondence in love--the lady's accession--was too good to be true, a sweetness that had something of the inauthentic, a taste of the delusory, about it.
It has been specifically designed to move human cognition from a delusory view of reality to a true one: that is, to one in which the profound inter connectedness of reality is directly perceived.
Even though Faustus has many delusory expectations about the extent of demonic abilities, he does at least have some idea of how this particular magic works, and the subsequent action of the play proves he was right on this point.
It invokes strangers' fantasies about the beauties of a place associated with white and innocent snow and a rural setting, fantasies which the second paragraph here quoted then shows to be delusory.
Hopeful of love's potential as an agent of social cohesion, the speaker envisions love leaving the delusory summer of private joy for the sterile winter of public debate, the "quarrel" amidst which love's "vigours" will "prove" all the more apparent.