delusion


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Related to delusion: schizophrenia, delirium, delusion of reference

delusion

 [dĕ-loo´zhun]
a false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof to the contrary and in spite of the fact that other members of the culture do not share the belief. adj., adj delu´sional.
bizarre delusion one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.
delusion of control the delusion that one's thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one's own but are being imposed by someone else or some other external force.
depressive delusion a delusion that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood, such as a delusion of serious illness, poverty, or spousal infidelity.
erotomanic delusion a delusional conviction that some other person, usually of higher status and often famous, is in love with the individual; it is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
fragmentary d's unconnected delusions not organized around a coherent theme.
delusion of grandeur (grandiose delusion) delusional conviction of one's own importance, power, or knowledge, or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of jealousy a delusional belief that one's spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence and often resulting in confrontation with the accused. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
mixed delusion one in which no central theme predominates. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of negation (nihilistic delusion) a depressive delusion that the self, part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.
paranoid d's an older term for delusion of grandeur and delusion of persecution; its use is discouraged.
delusion of persecution a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, cheated, persecuted, or conspired against. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of reference a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.
somatic delusion a delusion that there is some alteration in a bodily organ or its function. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
systematized d's a group of delusions organized around a common theme; typical of delusional disorders or paranoid schizophrenia.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn), Do not confuse this word with hallucination or illusion.
A false belief or wrong judgment, sometimes associated with hallucinations, held with conviction despite evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion

/de·lu·sion/ (dĕ-loo´zhun) an idiosyncratic false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary.delu´sional
bizarre delusion  one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.
delusion of control  the delusion that one's thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one's own but are being imposed by someone else or other external force.
depressive delusion  one that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood.
erotomanic delusion  one associated with erotomania.
delusion of grandeur , grandiose delusion delusional conviction of one's own importance, power, or knowledge or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person.
delusion of jealousy  a delusional belief that one's spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence.
mixed delusion  one in which no central theme predominates.
delusion of negation , nihilistic delusion a depressive delusion that the self or part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.
delusion of persecution  a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, persecuted, cheated, or conspired against.
delusion of reference  a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.
systematized delusions  a group of delusions organized around a common theme.

delusion

(dĭ-lo͞o′zhən)
n.
a. A false belief or opinion: labored under the delusion that success was at hand.
b. Psychiatry A false belief or perception that is a manifestation of a mental illness: delusions of persecution.

de·lu′sion·al adj.

delusion

[dilo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, deludere, to deceive
a persistent aberrant belief or perception held inviolable by a person despite evidence that refutes it. Kinds of delusion include delusion of being controlled, delusion of grandeur, delusion of persecution, nihilistic delusion, paranoid delusion, and somatic delusion. Compare illusion.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn)
A false belief or wrong judgment held with conviction despite incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion

A fixed belief, unassailable by reason, in something manifestly absurd or untrue. Psychotic delusions include delusions of persecution, of grandeur, of disease, of abnormality of body shape, of unworthiness, of unreality and of being malignly influenced by others.

Delusion

A false belief that is resistant to reason or contrary to actual fact. Common delusions include delusions of persecution, delusions about one s importance (sometimes called delusions of grandeur), or delusions of being controlled by others. In BDD, the delusion is related to the patient's perception of his or her body.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn) Do not confuse this word with hallucination or illusion.
A false belief or wrong judgment, sometimes associated with hallucinations, held with conviction despite evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion,

n a persistent, aberrant belief or perception held inviolable by a person despite evidence to the contrary.

Patient discussion about delusion

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about delusion
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case report, our aim is to discuss how disorders with psychotic symptoms may affect different cultural life styles, circumstances, experience, delusion contents of identification and acceptance in a patient formerly diagnosed with DSD with male- pseudohermaphroditism and followed up with the diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder (BAD).
I KNOW it seems a bit pathetic writing about an essay question that appeared in the Greek paper of the university entrance exams, but this was the probably the most inspired essay subject ever as it highlighted a disease of epidemic proportions in Kyproulla -- delusions.
Safety behaviors are thus reinforced, leading to maintenance and even support of delusion.
His latest, The Disease Delusion, takes readers on an enlightening and at times shocking journey of medical discovery.
The Fregoli Delusion provides another Donaghue and Stainer crime novel and is recommended for both prior fans of the dynamic duo and newcomers who need no prior introduction to the other three stories to appreciate the scenarios here.
3 ( ANI ): Congress leader Rashid Alvi on Sunday said that his party has only supported the decision of the Election Commission (EC) to restrict opinion polls, and added that opinion polls create delusion and misleads people.
By the time the typical child has reached adolescence, it will live in a world of considerable delusion about itself, other people and the world in general.
LISTENING to Sir Terry Leahy on Desert Island Discs, it was interesting to note that he suffers from a popular form of self delusion among the more recently successful that the world only started with them.
2 illustrates just as vividly, that all individuals are subject to some form of delusion.
So-called "Truman Show delusion" (referring to a 1998 Jim Carrey film) is a type of persecutory/grandiose delusion in which patients believe their lives are staged plays or reality television shows.
The most prominent delusion to have been dispelled is the talk about a secret agreement between the Muslim Brotherhood and the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF).
Khamenehi went on, "The exit from delusion in the first part is good.