deliver

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deliver

 [de-liv´er]
1. to aid in childbirth.
2. to remove, as a fetus, placenta, or lens of the eye.

de·liv·er

(dĕ-liv'ĕr),
1. To assist a woman in childbirth.
2. To extract from an enclosed place, as the fetus from the womb, an object or foreign body, for example, a tumor from its capsule or surroundings, or the lens of the eye in cases of cataract.
[fr. O. Fr. fr. L. de- + liber, free]

deliver

(dĭ-lĭv′ər)
v. deliv·ered, deliv·ering, deliv·ers
v.tr.
a. To give birth to: She delivered a baby boy this morning.
b. To assist (a woman) in giving birth: The doctor delivered her of twins.
c. To assist or aid in the birth of: The midwife delivered the baby.
v.intr.
To give birth: She expects to deliver in late August.

de·liv′er·a·bil′i·ty n.
de·liv′er·a·ble adj.
de·liv′er·er n.

de·liv·er

(dĕ-liv'ĕr)
1. To assist a woman in childbirth.
2. To extract from an enclosed place, as the fetus from the womb, an object or foreign body, e.g., a tumor from its capsule or surroundings, or the lens of the eye in cases of cataract.
[fr. O. Fr. fr. L. de- + liber, free]

deliver

1. to aid in parturition.
2. to remove, as a fetus, placenta or lens of the eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
How long does it take for a marketplace to figure out that the promise makers and the promise deliverers aren't together?
Linden Hills articulates, as does Alice Walker's The Color Purple, the question of a scriptural messiah/"God," a deliverer alien to the women in terms of race, gender, social experience, class, culture, and location.
But by asserting that he and his co-editor are the only "authoritative sources," he is excluding all the others--including the deliverer (who gave his own press interviews), the group of transcribers who boiled down the documents to 516 pages and the members of the faction that purportedly directed them and who copied the documents.
They have course developers who generally don't deliver; and course deliverers who generally don't develop.
Sikhs "do not think in the eschatological terms of Christian theology" (69), and as immediate spiritual liberation is open to all Sikhs, there is little need for a coming deliverer.
The rhetorical strategy of the book is to be described as one of `entrapment': by the end of the series of deliverer stories the reader has already decided the nature of true leadership in terms of the fundamental need for covenantal integrity; in the double denouement this leadership is then identified as monarchic, and, insofar as both prologue and denouement promote Judah at the expense of Benjamin, the ideal leadership is that of a Judean king (David) rather than a Benjaminite (Saul).
Regarding the deliverer, "If, therefore, there exists what man needs to be delivered from and Humanism insists of optimism as the only appropriate attitude, there must be a quest for a 'deliverer' in some form or other, even if in this case the quest is a short one since it is found ready to hand in the resources of reason, science, free inquiry, and a belief in the control of nature and of man himself, all of which is deemed sufficient for overcoming human ills.
The Semi-submersible Maersk Deliverer has been awarded a contract in Southeast Asia by Total E&P Malaysia.
The singer James Blunt has won a new reputation as a deliverer of razorsharp comebacks to those who use Twitter to casually insult him.
SwiftServe, a deliverer of content, announced on Monday that Chunghwa Telecom International (NYSE:CHT), a Taiwanese carrier, is launching CDN (Content Delivery Network) services based on SwiftServe technology.
It would appear that 'trust' is now as extinct as the Penny Black - regardless of who is the deliverer.
Many thanks to Matty, newspaper deliverer of the year as far as we are concer ned.