delay

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delay

 [de-la´]
a postponement to a later time.
atrioventricular delay (AV delay) atrioventricular interval (def. 2).

delay

(dĕ-lā'),
1. In a medical sense, to put off for a time, either for clinical reasons or through physiologic dysfunction.
2. The elapsed time inherent in sense 1.

de·lay

(dĕ-lā')
Postponement or deferral to a later time.
[O.Fr. deslaier, fr. Germanic]
References in periodicals archive ?
To identify differences in frequency distributions and mean scores between delayers and anticipators, we used two-tailed Student t-tests.
We modeled the likelihood of initiating intercourse within one year first for the entire sample and then separately for delayers and anticipators.
Reasons were significantly different between delayers and anticipators.
Anticipators had engaged in significantly more risky behaviors than delayers (1.
The different background profiles of anticipators and delayers suggest the presence of two contrasting contexts that influence the transition to first intercourse: Delayers appear to be more invested in deferring intercourse, and may be supported by their ties to parents and church.
Thirteen percent of delayers and 53% of anticipators initiated intercourse within a year of the 1988 survey (not shown), and the difference was statistically significant (p<.
However, being influenced by parents significantly increased the odds of first sex among delayers (2.
Family income increased the likelihood of sexual activity within the year only among delayers (1.
The odds ratios associated with school grades were similar for delayers (0.
By far the largest difference between delayers and anticipators was in the effect of having a mother who gave birth as a teenager.
Given the selective nature of the sample, race had no effect on sexual initiation among either group of youths, but older age increased the likelihood of transition to first sex among both delayers (1.
It explained 20% of the transition among delayers and 36% among anticipators.