delayed-onset muscle soreness

delayed-onset muscle soreness

Abbreviation: DOMS
Muscle tenderness, decreased strength, and decreased range of motion that develops 12 to 24 hr following strenuous exercise and peaks in intensity between 24 to 48 hr, although symptoms may persist 72 hr or more. DOMS may result from microtearing of muscular fibers, lactic acid accumulation, local inflammatory response, and/or physiochemical changes within the muscle fibers. Muscle soreness is most pronounced following eccentric exercise. See: eccentric exercise; inflammation
See also: muscle soreness

delayed-onset muscle soreness

; DOMS muscle soreness secondary to exercise, characterized by increasing pain/discomfort during subsequent 24-72 hours, and subsiding within a few days
References in periodicals archive ?
2002) Morphologic and mechanical basis of delayed-onset muscle soreness.
Subjects who took black tea extract produced significantly higher peak power and higher average mean power across intervals, and experienced significantly lower levels of delayed-onset muscle soreness 24 and 48 hours post-workout
It has been reported for some time that delayed-onset muscle soreness often results after novel, unaccustomed muscular contractions [24].
elimination of delayed-onset muscle soreness by pre-resistance cardioacceleration before each set.
Effects of acupuncture on symptoms and muscle function in delayed-onset muscle soreness.
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether twenty minutes of thermotherapy, cryotherapy, or moderate-intensity cardiovascular exercise could effectively reduce the severity of delayed-onset muscle soreness.
The eccentric muscle contractions cause damage to muscle fibres (Friden and Lieber 2001, Morgan 1990, Morgan and Allen 1999, Proske and Morgan 2001) triggering a chain of events that produce delayed-onset muscle soreness (Armstrong 1984), swelling (Cleak and Eston 1992), loss of range of motion (Cleak and Eston 1992), and loss of strength (Cleak and Eston 1992, Sayers et al 2000).
The others concerned the effective use of Farabloc in treating phantom limb pain and delayed-onset muscle soreness.
Transdermal ketoprofen, an investigational topical agent, appears to be effective in reducing self-reported delayed-onset muscle soreness after repetitive muscle contraction, Christopher Cannavino reported at the annual meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine.
Most runners recognize Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)--the morning after aches, stiffness, and muscle pain caused by a strenuous workout--as benevolent pain.
Delayed-onset muscle soreness is the ordinary stiffness most people get after a workout and will be felt in the middle of the muscle and will usually disappear in one to three days.