deinstitutionalize

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deinstitutionalize

(dē-ĭn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. deinstitutional·ized, deinstitutional·izing, deinstitutional·izes
1. To remove the status of an institution from.
2. To release (a mental health patient, for example) from an institution for placement and care in the community.

de·in′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
In spite of the high prevalence of elderly patients in the long-term population of psychiatric hospitals, most studies that look at deinstitutionalizing people to community residential units excludes the elderly with mental disorders (8).
2 (1996): 277-316; Fukuyama, The Great Disruption; Nock, "The Social Costs of Deinstitutionalizing Marriage"; Aguirre, "The Family and Economic Development"; idem, Determinants of Economic Growth; idem, Family Structure and the Process of Economic Growth; idem, "Revisiting Altruism in the Family"; and Maria Sophia Aguirre and Martha Cruz Zuniga, "The Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth: Fixed and Human Capital," Mimeo (2010), among others.
Power identifies this as key to deinstitutionalizing the environment.
The Green House concept of deinstitutionalizing long-term care residences is not new.
Officially recognizing genderless marriage, and thereby deinstitutionalizing man-woman marriage, will first diminish and then largely eliminate the latter institution's valuable and unique social goods.
Never again should we abandon the mentally ill in the name of deinstitutionalizing them.
Ultimately, in both cases paradoxically enough the (literary) museum emerges as a supreme deinstitutionalizing power.
It has been my sense that the real and long-term legacy of Vatican II will be that it initiated the process of deinstitutionalizing the church.
In retrospect, policymakers, clinicians, and rehabilitation professionals, in their zeal for deinstitutionalizing people with SMI, may not have grasped the complexities and difficulties that people with SMI experience when living in the community (Bachrach & Clark, 1996; Booth, 1993; Grob 1991, 1992; Klerman et al.
It is in the processes of dislocation, the deinstitutionalizing of life at different levels, that violence is deployed.
Dean Schwartz and his staff implemented the legislation that allocated federal funding to many states for deinstitutionalizing status offenders, removing juveniles from adult jails and lockups, establishing shelters and counseling programs for runaways, and improving delinquency prevention programs.