deinstitutionalize


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deinstitutionalize

(dē-ĭn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. deinstitutional·ized, deinstitutional·izing, deinstitutional·izes
1. To remove the status of an institution from.
2. To release (a mental health patient, for example) from an institution for placement and care in the community.

de·in′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Has the shift to deinstitutionalize status offenders, to punish juvenile criminals as adults, to triage juveniles' aberrant behaviors to treatment centers (if they can afford it), and to focus on sexually abusive behaviors (of primarily boys) changed the courtroom and correctional environments, in terms of girls' sexuality?
50) Thus, when a same-sex couple successfully asserts a "right to marry," they are not imposing on the state a correlative duty to allow them into the existing man-woman marriage institution--which the law is impotent to do, (51) although it is sufficiently potent to deinstitutionalize man-woman marriage.
A number of court cases resulted in court orders to deinstitutionalize persons with developmental disabilities.
The latter group was served primarily through the mental health system before the movement to deinstitutionalize.
A planned evaluation of a social reform should (a) apply randomized, control group design; (b) specify the changes to be measured, that is, define the primary goals in quantifiable individual terms; (c) specify the research methods; (d) apply staggered deinstitutionalization, that is, deinstitutionalize in one institution, city, county, or region at the time to ensure a possibility of terminating or reforming a reform if its intentions are not met.
For parents, treatment for PKU offered a chance of success in their efforts to deinstitutionalize their progeny.
Because of the wide-spread trend to deinstitutionalize patients, it makes more sense to look at state programs in each of these areas individually, taking into account community programs as well as state institutions.
With growing community interest in holistic approaches to health, the opportunity exists to deinstitutionalize music therapy and to extend the field beyond the disability arena.
State hospitals, on the other hand, lost 90,000 workers, reflecting, at least in part, the trend to deinstitutionalize mental patients.
These task forces pointed us in the direction of reform, endorsing our approach to juvenile offender classification and developing a plan to deinstitutionalize lower-risk offenders by creating a series of smaller and more therapeutic community-based programs.
Lykos: In the late '70s, there was this great movement to deinstitutionalize our mental institutions, and so instead of the state housing and caring for people, they're living under bridges.
Bill Thomas created another program, the Green House Project, which requires management to deinstitutionalize and create a more social atmosphere to allow residents to "focus on life" (The Green House Project, 2008).