deinstitutionalization


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de·in·sti·tu·tion·al·i·za·tion

(dē'in-sti-tū'shŭn-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
The discharge of institutionalized patients from a mental hospital into treatment programs in halfway houses and other community-based programs.

deinstitutionalization

[dē·in′stityo̅o̅′shənal′īzā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + instituere, to put in place
a change in the location and focus of mental health care from an institutional to a community setting.

de·in·sti·tu·tion·al·i·za·tion

(dē-in'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
The discharge of institutionalized patients from a mental hospital into treatment programs in halfway houses and other community-based programs.

deinstitutionalization

(dē-ĭn″stĭ-tū″shŭn-ăl-ĭ-zā′shŭn)
The placement of hospitalized psychiatric patients in the community in halfway houses, community mental health centers, residential hotels, group homes, or boarding houses.
References in periodicals archive ?
This national strategy called "evaluation service and monitoring of therapeutic measures for the person with mental disorder in conflict with the law" established by Ordinance 94 of January 14, 2014, created a deinstitutionalization device to the so-called "judicial patients" connecting the criminal justice systems, SUS and SUAS (26).
DOJ's Olmstead enforcement actions bear out an interpretation of Olmstead that mandates "community integration for everyone" by pursuing forced deinstitutionalization, without any regard to the choice or needs of affected individuals, contrary to Olmstead.
Despite inadequate resources and other limitations, the deinstitutionalization of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has been a quiet triumph.
6) A recent study from Australia found that even six years after deinstitutionalization, issues of social integration remain.
Lawsuits related to deinstitutionalization brought on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities are a small part of P&As' overall activities for this population.
Deinstitutionalization refers to a shift in the care of mentally ill persons from long-term psychiatric hospitalization to more independent living environments.
Reason: The deinstitutionalization of mental patients has been criticized for putting helpless people, sometimes dangerous people, on the streets.
Not in my back yard" (NIMBY) developed more than 30 years ago, at a time when the deinstitutionalization of various groups of disabled people was socially and poltically popular in much of North America.
An in-depth examination of the political, social and cultural history of the Russian Orthodox Church at the parish level provides an important corrective to the traditional structural approach that has assumed that the church was decimated by Bolshevik policies of deinstitutionalization, violence against the ecclesiastical hierarchy, and anti-religious propaganda.
Over the past two decades, deinstitutionalization and limited community-based resources gradually increased the number of severely .
Chapters Seven through Nine, the crux of part two, detail how Gaza's de-development occurred due to policies that may be conceptualized by expropriation and dispossession; integration and externalization; and deinstitutionalization.
The purpose of this case series is to describe the medical care of a group of adults with mental retardation during their first year of community residence following deinstitutionalization, and to provide practical advice to family physicians who care for these adults.