deinstitutionalization


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de·in·sti·tu·tion·al·i·za·tion

(dē'in-sti-tū'shŭn-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
The discharge of institutionalized patients from a mental hospital into treatment programs in halfway houses and other community-based programs.

deinstitutionalization

[dē·in′stityo̅o̅′shənal′īzā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + instituere, to put in place
a change in the location and focus of mental health care from an institutional to a community setting.

de·in·sti·tu·tion·al·i·za·tion

(dē-in'sti-tū'shŭn-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
The discharge of institutionalized patients from a mental hospital into treatment programs in halfway houses and other community-based programs.

deinstitutionalization

(dē-ĭn″stĭ-tū″shŭn-ăl-ĭ-zā′shŭn)
The placement of hospitalized psychiatric patients in the community in halfway houses, community mental health centers, residential hotels, group homes, or boarding houses.
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted Samuel Bagenstos, former Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General in DOJ's Civil Rights Division and a key litigator in deinstitutionalization Cases--
Although both the states and federal government have dramatically increased their investment in developmental services, for adults with developmental disabilities this investment has been primarily in the aspects of deinstitutionalization involved with downsizing or closing institutions and transition of residents from institutions to community living.
TO LOOK FORWARD WE NEED TO LOOK BACKTHE GHOST OF DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION PAST
Another serious issue with deinstitutionalization in general is that it can involve transferring residents of mental health facilities to nursing homes without regard for patients' rights or potential threats to the safety of the traditional residents.
The Community Mental Health Centers Act of 1963 became the symbol for deinstitutionalization.
In his review of studies on homelessness and severe mental illness, he fails to mention that the policy of deinstitutionalization has been found to be a contributor.
Deinstitutionalization and community-based care for the chronically mentally ill.
Just as institutionalization grew out of economic change, so deinstitutionalization was based on the recognition that a segregative social control policy was too expensive and that an inexpensive (and equally ineffectual) alternative was available.
These efforts include: promoting implementation of the 2012-2018 Action Plan to Ensure Rights and Improve the Quality of Life for People with Disabilities in the Republic of Kazakhstan putting a system of special social service standards in place implementing and improving deinstitutionalization of medical and social institutions streamlining the state social benefit system
Utilizing what he describes as a multimethod, interdisciplinary, and critical-realistic perspective, and after describing the setting for his study and the historical antecedents that gave rise to the social policy of the deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill, the remaining nine chapters present his ethnographic study of case managers.
The deinstitutionalization of healthcare that occurred with home healthcare has weakened support for the institution-based, biomedical model of care delivery.
Although parents and consumers played a role in the initiation of deinstitutionalization, the battle over this process has resulted in a redefinition of professional control rather than in the empowering of consumers.