dehalogenation

dehalogenation

(dē-hăl″ō-jĕ-nā′shŭn) [L. de, from, + Gr. hals, salt, + gennan, to produce]
The removal of halogens, such as bromine, chlorine, fluorine, or iodine from molecules. Halogenated organic compounds are important pollutants of rivers, streams, and marine environments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glutathione is the reducing agent for the reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloro-p-hydroquinone by extracts from a Flavobacterium sp.
Patent 8,647,824 (February 11, 2014), "Microbial Reductive Dehalogenation of Vinyl Chloride," Alfred M.
A negligible fraction could undergo dehalogenation in the Phase I stage of the metabolism pathway to form unknown metabolites.
Dehalogenation of organic halogen compound by electrolytic reduction in ionic liquid.
Since it was easy to prepare dihalo compounds, regioselective dehalogenation was attempted.
These chemicals can react with fumigants such as methyl bromide, 1,3-D, chloropicrin and iodomethane (methyl iodide) to form nonvolatile compounds by dehalogenation (Gan, Yates, Becker, et al.
More notable among the technologies that are being researched for the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated by PCBs are: biodegradation, biodegradation in combination with photolysis, heterogeneous photocatalysis, dehalogenation by alkaline polyethylene glycol, and oxidation with ozone [2-13].
Aust 1996 "Compounds and methods for reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic halocarbons.
The DBU material is said to service a broad spectrum of applications ranging from a dehalogenation agent, epoxy curative, urethane catalyst and pharmaceuticals.
However, our preliminary results indicate that a reductive dehalogenation occurs, producing trichloro-l,4-hydroquinone.
Physical and chemical processes include separation/filtration, dehalogenation, evaporation, and incineration.