degree


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Related to degree: degree of a polynomial, academic degree, Degree of comparison, Degree courses

degree

 [dĕ-gre´]
1. a grade or rank within a series, especially a rank awarded to scholars by a college or university.
2. a unit of measure of temperature.
3. a unit of measure of arcs and angles, one degree being 1/360 of a circle.
4. one of the ranks or stages in a progressive series.
d's of freedom (df) the number of ways that the members of a sample can vary independently. For example, if a sample contains n scores and the sum of those scores is known, n − 1 scores are free to vary; the nth score, however, is not free to vary but is determined by the values of the other scores and the established sum of the scores. In this example, the degrees of freedom equal the sample size minus 1 (df = n − 1).

de·gree

(dĕ-grē'),
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer, barometer, etc. see Comparative Temperature Scales appendix.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

degree

(dĭ-grē′)
n.
1. A unit of measure on a temperature scale.
2. One of a series of steps in a process, course, or progression; a stage.
3. A classification of the severity of an injury, especially a burn.

degree (deg)

Etymology: Fr, degre
one of the divisions or intervals marked on a scale of units of measurement.

degree

Academentia A document that indicates completion of a course of study

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer. seescale.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]

degree

1. a grade or rank awarded scholars by a college or university.
2. a unit of measure of temperature.
3. a unit of measure of arcs and angles, one degree being 1/360 of a circle.

Patient discussion about degree

Q. What are first, second and third degree burns? What’s the difference between them and do they get treated in a different way?

A. Pain management for burns can be difficult since burns differ in type and severity. There are three types of burns:

First-degree burns are considered mild compared to other burns. They result in pain and reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin).

Second-degree burns affect the epidermis and the dermis (lower layer of skin). They cause pain, redness, swelling, and blistering.

Third-degree burns go through the dermis and affect deeper tissues. They result in white or blackened, charred skin that may be numb.
Hope this helps.

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/pain-caused-by-burns

Q. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes? I wanted to be a great sportsman. I am from a family where fitness is given least importance. My father is diabetic and my mom from obesity. They have sick lifestyle and weird food pattern. They do not exercise at all and would laugh at me every time when I wear my shoes. I am normal but they just ignore me and think that I cannot be a sportsman. I would love to get moving and show this world that I can achieve my dreams. May father want me to help him and he is a truck driver. He eats 10 times per day and has never tried exercising his whole life. Already doctors have advice him and found that he has more cholesterol but he just phewphews them laughing. I think I have a great lesson from my parents on how not to be and I am very much interested in sports. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes?

A. it's good to hear you are taking responsibility over your health, it's not taken for granted. most sports, if you want to get in to Olympic standard,needs a great fitness. but i can tell you that swimming needs great physical strength, so is running and bicycle racing. so you can go do triathlon!

Q. What is the difference between MD an ND? I saw an ad for some pain reliving therapy with the degree ND attached to the therapist name. Is it the same as MD? Is this therapist a doctor? What does it mean?

A. You can read more about it in wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Naturopathic_Medicine . You should notice that in many states this degree isn’t regulated, so essentially anyone can entitle himself as ND.

More discussions about degree
References in classic literature ?
The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man; and we see them everywhere brought into different degrees of activity, according to the different circumstances of civil society.
The iceberg was by degrees becoming an ice-field, the mountain a plain.
Ferguson carefully remarked that they had not gone beyond the second degree of south latitude, nor the twenty-ninth of east longitude.
In a large degree it has been the pennies, the nickels, and the dimes which have come from the Sunday-schools, the Christian Endeavour societies, and the missionary societies, as well as from the church proper, that have helped to elevate the Negro at so rapid a rate.
The third consideration is the degree to which we apprehend that endless chain of causation inevitably demanded by reason, in which each phenomenon comprehended, and therefore man's every action, must have its definite place as a result of what has gone before and as a cause of what will follow.
The mercury was rising very slowly now, though even at 145 degrees it was almost unbearable within the narrow confines of our metal prison.
He raised a certain building in his court-yard by a story, which shutting out the sun, took half a degree of warmth from Boxtel's garden, and, on the other hand, added half a degree of cold in winter; not to mention that it cut the wind, and disturbed all the horticultural calculations and arrangements of his neighbour.
Domestic races of the same species, also, often have a somewhat monstrous character; by which I mean, that, although differing from each other, and from the other species of the same genus, in several trifling respects, they often differ in an extreme degree in some one part, both when compared one with another, and more especially when compared with all the species in nature to which they are nearest allied.
However, she at last conversed with Square with such a degree of intimacy that malicious tongues began to whisper things of her, to which, as well for the sake of the lady, as that they were highly disagreeable to the rule of right and the fitness of things, we will give no credit, and therefore shall not blot our paper with them.
This degree of force or liveliness is part of what we ordinarily mean by the intensity of a sensation.
On our way up we met the crowd returning--men and women dressed in all sorts of queer costumes, and exhibiting all degrees of cold and wretchedness in their gaits and countenances.
But, inasmuch as it is equally necessary to take into account the deviation which the rotary motion of the earth will impart to the shot, and as the shot cannot reach the moon until after a deviation equal to 16 radii of the earth, which, calculated upon the moon's orbit, are equal to about eleven degrees, it becomes necessary to add these eleven degrees to those which express the retardation of the moon just mentioned: that is to say, in round numbers, about sixty-four degrees.