degeneracy

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de·gen·er·a·cy

(dĕ-jen'ĕr-ă-sē),
1. A condition marked by deterioration of mental, physical, or moral processes.
2. The fact that several different triplet codons encode the same amino acid.
[L. de, from, + genus, (gener-), race]

degeneracy

(dĭ-jĕn′ər-ə-sē)
n. pl. degenera·cies
1.
a. The process of degenerating.
b. The state of being degenerate.
2. Genetics The presence in the genetic code of multiple codons for the same amino acid. Also called redundancy.
Genetics Hereditary degeneration
Molecular biology The presence of 2 or more ‘synonym’ codons for a single amino acid, i.e., redundancy. See Degenerate code
Psychiatry An obsolete term for ‘moral bankrupcy’, now included under the rubric of psychotic disorders, formerly deviant behaviour, degenerate behaviour

degeneracy

In the genetic code this is a reference to the redundancy of codons arising from the fact that four bases, taken three at a time, offer 64 possibilities, while it is necessary to code for only 20 amino acids and three stop signals. The effect is that in many cases a change in the third base of a codon will not change the amino acid selected.

degeneracy

a situation in the GENETIC CODE where most amino acids are coded by more than one triplet of DNA NUCLEOTIDE bases. For example, ARGININE is coded by CGU, CGC, CGA and CGG CODONS. See also CRICK.

de·gen·er·a·cy

(dĕ-jen'ĕr-ă-sē)
A condition marked by deterioration of mental or physical processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
To remove such degeneracies we apply a procedure just like the one desribed above for negligible singular values.
It contains nine chapters addressing the advantages of polygon meshes for digital geometry processing, efficient data structures for the implementation of polygon meshes, fundamental concepts of differential geometry, algorithms for mesh smoothing, methods for computing surface parameterizations, general remeshing methods, mesh simplification and approximation techniques, sources of input data methods and methods for removing geometric and topological degeneracies and inconsistencies, and techniques for shape deformation.
The Howard building came to represent a century of incurable degeneracies, as well as a century of violent "therapies" that took place in the building: arsenic, insulin, and metrazol "therapies," electroconvulsive shock, and lobotomies were all performed on site in the first half of the twentieth century (Fisher, 2000, pp.