deformation

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deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation (dē´fôrmā´shən),

n a distortion; a disfigurement.
deformation, elastic,
n the change in shape of an object under an applied load from which the object can recover or return to its original unloaded state when the load is removed.
deformation, inelastic,
n a deformation occurring when a material is stressed beyond its elastic limit.
deformation, permanent,
n a deformation occurring beyond the yield point so that the structure will not return to its original dimensions after removal of the applied force.

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bond properties as the governing criteria for deformational analysis.
The TWCS method is suitable for repeated multiple assessment of changes of deformational characteristics with using a single sample in the case when the reachable tensile deformation [epsilon] is small enough, reversible, and does not cause any permanent changes of the material structure.
Deformational anomalies are those occurring from extrinsic forces on an otherwise normally shaped ear in utero or postnatally.
n] deformational region of Additive 2 consists of three peaks, located at 1453 [cm.
Late Miocene reorientation of deformational stresses--usually ascribed to the readjustment of Pacific oceanic plates that lead to the generation of the Cocos Plate--produced a compressional phase of the Andean Orogen that favored deformation of forearc basins.
Thus textual inscription, while seeming to fix fama's wandering in material form, and giving the illusion of a fixed structure of meaning, actually gives rise to a deformational excess by marking fama as simultaneously and both concrete and personified, irreducible to one or the other.
The volume addresses the intracranial topics of arachnoid cysts; communicating, noncommunicating, and compartmentalized hydrocephalus; slit ventricle syndrome; craniopharyngioma; optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas; ependymomas; scaphocephaly/sagittal synostosis; deformational plagiocephaly; intracranial suppuration; chiari malformations; intractable epilepsy, moyamoya disease; and pediatric aneurysms, as well as the intraspinal topics of myelomeningocele, lipomyelomeningocele/tethered cord, intramedullary spinal cord tumors, spasticity, and syrnigomyelia.
The physical interpretation of the two moduli is as follows: The elastic modulus (also known as the storage modulus since elastic behaviour implies the storage of deformational energy) G' is the in-phase component of the stress and is concerned with elastic nature of the material; The viscous modulus G" (also known as the loss modulus since viscous deformation results in the dissipation of energy) is the out-of-phase component of the stress and characterizes the viscous nature of the material.
Multiple gold mineralisation events are interpreted to have occurred at Apollo Hill during a complex deformational history.