deformation


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Related to deformation: Plastic deformation

deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation (dē´fôrmā´shən),

n a distortion; a disfigurement.
deformation, elastic,
n the change in shape of an object under an applied load from which the object can recover or return to its original unloaded state when the load is removed.
deformation, inelastic,
n a deformation occurring when a material is stressed beyond its elastic limit.
deformation, permanent,
n a deformation occurring beyond the yield point so that the structure will not return to its original dimensions after removal of the applied force.

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first studies we used beech wood and could predict the deformation (bending) of the prong samples fairly good.
Lowrie's argument against shock deformation as a possible explanation for metal bending PK sounds good at first blush.
The irreversibility of plastic deformation is represented by energy dissipative motion of the charge, which causes the plastic wave to decay.
Milling deformation forecast model for whole layer stripping piece
Localised plastic deformations were researched at deformation states within interval [beta] = (-1/2;0).
They feature a good combination of strength and ductility provided by the TRIP effect based on the deformation induced martensitic transformation (Bleck, 2002).
The methods for determination of critical stress are based on one-valuedness of stress (the ordinate) at the end of the linear length OA in the diagram of compression (at the point A), which characterizes the stress and deformation before passing into the next phase of compression related to appearance of injuries in the mutual contacts between mineral filaments (Gnip et al.
to develop a methodology of evaluating the effectiveness of a deformation zone.
Taking account of mold deformation and plastic stress relaxation are two new capabilities in new version 4.
A theoretical analysis of the stress-state and deformations of the stone bridge structure caused by nonstress effects and the in-situ monitoring of deformation changes of the breast walls and the bridge vaults of the historic structure of Charles Bridge (from the mid-14th century) manifested a response and a growth in permanent deformations and disintegration of the stone bridge structure due to the effects of temperature and moisture.
1] can be assigned to the symmetrical and unsymmetrical deformation of the C-H bond in the C[H.