defoliant

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defoliant

a chemical used to remove the leaves from plants to facilitate mechanical harvesting. The early defoliants, especially arsenical compounds, presented serious hazards if the plants were later fed to livestock or if the spray drifted to nearby pasture paddocks. Modern defoliants are nontoxic if used according to manufacturer's recommendations. See mcpa, tributyl triphosphorotrithioite, thidiazuron.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects on performance in the palms were investigated by manual defoliation to simulate pest attack (Wood et al.
The presence of nectaries on leaves, flowers, and sugary secretions of damaged fruits by insects may explain the correlation between higher numbers of ants and reduction of defoliation by beetles, caterpillars and leaf mining by Lepidoptera.
Three years of complete defoliation is usually enough to kill a tree; evergreen, young, or weak trees may succumb in just 1 year.
Super Boll(R) brand ethephon is a single active ingredient plant growth regulator, used primarily to accelerate the opening of mature cotton bolls and to enhance defoliation for earlier harvest in cotton.
Trees weakened by defoliation are more susceptible to the ravages of disease organisms, other insects, and drought.
The danger will be if defoliation causes additional stress,'' said Teresa Poscewicz, the zoo's horticulture manager.
A high level of specificity and significant defoliation of tropical soda apple were demonstrated in host-specificity tests conducted at the Florida Biological Control Laboratory quarantine facilities in Gainesville, the USDA-ARS (Agriculture Research Service) South American Biological Control Laboratory in Argentina, and the USDAARS quarantine facilities in Stoneville, Mississippi, as well as in extensive field surveys and open-field tests conducted in South America.
The fungus may have finally dispatched it, but clearly, defoliation by the caterpillar opened the way for other agents that otherwise probably would not have posed a serious threat.
The mean percent defoliation of Chinese privet over all sites and years was 20.
In the course of defoliation, countless veterans were exposed to the chemicals.
Where roots become exceedingly dense, as indicated by defoliation in older potted ficus trees, root ball volume should be reduced by one-third and new soil added to fill the empty space.