negative symptom

(redirected from deficit symptom)

negative symptom

one of the deficit symptoms of schizophrenia that follow from diminished volition and executive function including inertia, anergia, lack of involvement with the environment, poverty of thought, social withdrawal, and blunted affect.

negative symptom

diminishing or absence of a characteristic of normal health as an indication of disease, such as the flat affect or mutism sometimes seen in schizophrenia. Compare positive symptom.

negative symptom

Any symptom involving loss of normal mental function, as seen in schizophrenia, psychosis, depression and other mental disorders.
 
Examples
Blunting or decreased range of affect; loss of will, pleasure, sense of purpose and social drives; inhibited fluency and content of speech, and range of motion; poverty of speech, movement and motivation; loss of interests in previously enjoyable activities.

negative symptom

Deficit symptom Psychiatry Any Sx involving loss of normal mental function, seen in schizophrenia, depression, and other mental disorders Examples Blunting of or ↓ range of affect, loss of will, pleasure, fluency, and content of speech, range of emotion, sense of purpose, social drives, poverty of speech, loss of interests. See Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, Schizophrenia. Cf Positive symptom.

neg·a·tive symp·tom

(neg'ă-tiv simp'tŏm)
One of the deficit symptoms of schizophrenia that follow from diminished volition and executive function including inertia, anergia, lack of involvement with the environment, poverty of thought, social withdrawal, and blunted affect.
References in periodicals archive ?
9) also found significant associations of attention deficit symptoms with PTSD symptom severity among children exposed to the Bosnian war.
499 Post test Table 6: results of t dependent groups to investigate the mean difference of the attention deficit symptoms and hyperactivity of parents' behavior management training of experimental group between the following-up and post tests Mean Std deviation Difference of means Following up 6.
Christopher Ferguson of Stetson University and independent researcher Cheryl Olson from the US, found that the playing of such games actually had a very slight calming effect on youths with attention deficit symptoms and helped to reduce their aggressive and bullying behaviour.
The researchers found no association between the playing of violent video games and subsequent increased delinquent criminality or bullying in children with either clinically elevated depressive or attention deficit symptoms.
Not until my daughter was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and successfully treated did I begin to question my own attention deficit symptoms, which had begun to surface when I started school.
Earlier onset of schizophrenia, better premorbid functioning, and mild deficit symptoms are associated with greater risk of substance use.
Over the long haul, patients hospitalized for schizophrenia stand a greater chance of returning to the hospital and sinking into social isolation if they suffer from deficit symptoms, assert Wayne S.
The large majority of deficit patients spent most of the follow-up period in psychiatric hospitals and rarely landed jobs; patients without deficit symptoms spent less than half the follow-up period in psychiatric hospitals and held jobs for one-third of that time.
Researchers at University of Illinois report that exposure to natural settings in the course of common after-school and weekend activities may be "widely effective" in reducing attention deficit symptoms in children.
For instance, another research group recently reported that patients with severe deficit symptoms, but not necessarily an early age of onset, fared most poorly over two decades (SN: 3/21/92, p.
Schiziphrenia consists of recurrent psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and persistent deficit symptoms, such as emotional unresponsiveness and apathy (SN: 3/21/91, p.
Still, the presence or absence of deficit symptoms, based on broad definitions now in use, proves a better long-term predictor of how a schizophrenic individual will function than to the signs of psychosis, Fenton and McGlashan report in the March ARCHIVES OF GENERAL PSYCHIATRY.