defensiveness


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de·fen·sive·ness

(dē-fen'siv-nĕs)
Excessive reaction to nonnoxious stimuli, across one or more sensory systems.
See also: tactile defensiveness
References in periodicals archive ?
Defensiveness is a significant barrier to communication.
This procedure might therefore be useful for experimental manipulations in which slightly higher baseline levels of defensiveness are desirable.
Disarm defensiveness by prefacing your comments with "the reader" and avoiding the personal pronouns "you" or "I.
Comments about character will increase your employee's defensiveness.
Marketing messages that compare or contrast moms bounce off a wall of defensiveness.
Beck (2004) has recently argued that, although existential defensiveness may motivate some religious persons, existential engagement is compatible with religious belief.
He gives an introduction to the psychodynamic approach and instructions for the first session, gives advice on the importance of time and boundaries, then explores the middle phase of counseling, which includes developing depth, dealing with defensiveness and working on the centrality of the therapeutic relationship, and coordinating breaks and endings.
ON DECEMBER 13, 2001, I posted an essay on my personal weblog titled "Two Ships Passing in the New Media Night," in which I contrasted the energetic, proletariat-embracing exultations of rising blog superstar Glenn "Instapundit" Reynolds with the dreary, public-distrusting defensiveness of then-Los Angeles Times columnist John Balzar.
Instead, it often leads to defensiveness and increased levels of resistance.
Even the ones who didn't speak English," he added with some defensiveness.
If the choice of topic signaled a certain defensiveness, there was good enough reason.
It is circumscribed by a rigid orthodoxy and defensiveness that has taken all the humanity and compassion out of Christianity.