defect


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Related to defect: mass defect, defect management, Software defect

defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect

/de·fect/ (de´fekt) an imperfection, failure, or absence.defec´tive
acquired defect  a non-genetic imperfection arising secondarily, after birth.
aortic septal defect  a congenital anomaly in which there is abnormal communication between the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery just above the semilunar valves.
atrial septal defects , atrioseptal defects congenital anomalies in which there is persistent patency of the atrial septum, owing to failure of the ostium primum or ostium secundum.
Enlarge picture
Atrial septal defects; cutaway composite view showing possible locations of ostium primum and secundum defects in the right atrium.
birth defect  one present at birth, whether a morphological defect (dysmorphism) or an inborn error of metabolism.
congenital defect  birth d.
congenital ectodermal defect  anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.
cortical defect  a benign, symptomless, circumscribed rarefaction of cortical bone, detected radiographically.
endocardial cushion defects  a spectrum of septal defects resulting from imperfect fusion of the endocardial cushions, and ranging from persistent ostium primum to persistent common atrioventricular canal; see atrial septal d. and atrioventricularis communis.
fibrous cortical defect  a small, asymptomatic, osteolytic, fibrous lesion occurring within the bone cortex, particularly in the metaphyseal region of long bones in childhood.
filling defect  any localized defect in the contour of the stomach, duodenum, or intestine, as seen in the radiograph after a barium enema.
genetic defect  see under disease.
luteal phase defect  inadequate secretory transformation of the endometrium during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; it can cause habitual abortion.
metaphyseal fibrous defect 
neural tube defect  a developmental anomaly of failure of closure of the neural tube, resulting in conditions such as anencephaly or spina bifida.
retention defect  a defect in the power of recalling or remembering names, numbers, or events.
septal defect  a defect in a cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between the opposite chambers of the heart.
ventricular septal defect  a congenital cardiac anomaly in which there is persistent patency of the ventricular septum in either the muscular or fibrous portions, most often due to failure of the bulbar septum to completely close the interventricular foramen.
Enlarge picture
Abnormal communication between the ventricles in ventricular septal defect.

defect

Medtalk A malformation or abnormality. See Acquired platelet function defect, Atrial septal defect, Atrioventricular conduction defect, Birth defect, Developmental field defect, Enzyme defect, Epigenetic defect, Fibrous cortical defect, Filling defect, Homonymous field defect, Mass defect, Neural tube defect, Slot defect, Ventricular septal defect.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, anomaly, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; a qualitative departure from what is expected. usage note Often confused with deficiency, which is a quantitative shortcoming.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect,

n 1. congenital anomaly in structure or function that may or may not be life-threatening.
2. failure of a product to meet a reasonable expectation of performance and safety to the consumer.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]

defect,

n 1. the absence of some legal requisite.
2. an imperfection.
defect, atrial septal,
n a congenital defect in the heart that is often present from birth. It is sometimes referred to as a “hole” in the heart and is caused by the unsuccessful closure of the septum between the atria of the heart. The failure of the septum to close properly leaves a hole between the right and left atria.
defect, operative,
n the incomplete repair of bone after root resection or periapical curettage.
defect, osseous,
n a concavity in the bone surrounding one or more teeth, resulting from periodontal disease.
defect, speech,
n deviation of speech that is outside the range of acceptable variation in a given environment.

defect

an imperfection, failure or absence.

filling defect
an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of viscus revealed by contrast radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ, foreign body or other space-occupying lesions.
negative defect
in neurology, a movement that cannot be performed, such as in paresis or paralysis.
positive defect
in neurology, an involuntary movement, such as tremors, abnormal posture or seizures.
septal defect
a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. See also aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect.

Patient discussion about defect

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defect
References in classic literature ?
The recommendatory act of Congress is in the words following: "WHEREAS, There is provision in the articles of Confederation and perpetual Union, for making alterations therein, by the assent of a Congress of the United States, and of the legislatures of the several States; and whereas experience hath evinced, that there are defects in the present Confederation; as a mean to remedy which, several of the States, and PARTICULARLY THE STATE OF NEW YORK, by express instructions to their delegates in Congress, have suggested a convention for the purposes expressed in the following resolution; and such convention appearing to be the most probable mean of establishing in these States A FIRM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT:
Therefore, do not let our princes accuse fortune for the loss of their principalities after so many years' possession, but rather their own sloth, because in quiet times they never thought there could be a change (it is a common defect in man not to make any provision in the calm against the tempest), and when afterwards the bad times came they thought of flight and not of defending themselves, and they hoped that the people, disgusted with the insolence of the conquerors, would recall them.
It is one of the defects of my character that I cannot altogether dislike anyone who makes me laugh.
Everyone had some defect, of body or of mind: he thought of all the people he had known (the whole world was like a sick-house, and there was no rhyme or reason in it), he saw a long procession, deformed in body and warped in mind, some with illness of the flesh, weak hearts or weak lungs, and some with illness of the spirit, languor of will, or a craving for liquor.
And we have admitted that justice is the excellence of the soul, and injustice the defect of the soul?
For example, in the animal kingdom the physiologist has observed that no creatures are favorites, but a certain compensation balances every gift and every defect.
I am not conscious, madam," said he, "of any defect there; nor am I, I hope, suspected of any such.
Of defects did the spirit of those Saviours consist; but into every defect had they put their illusion, their stop-gap, which they called God.
In the following cases: physical defect in the married parties, desertion without communication for five years," he said, crooking a short finger covered with hair, "adultery" (this word he pronounced with obvious satisfaction), "subdivided as follows" (he continued to crook his fat fingers, though the three cases and their subdivisions could obviously not be classified together): "physical defect of the husband or of the wife, adultery of the husband or of the wife.
Then if there are any imperfections in the constitutions of states (and that many such exist the diversity of constitutions is alone sufficient to assure us), custom has without doubt materially smoothed their inconveniences, and has even managed to steer altogether clear of, or insensibly corrected a number which sagacity could not have provided against with equal effect; and, in fine, the defects are almost always more tolerable than the change necessary for their removal; in the same manner that highways which wind among mountains, by being much frequented, become gradually so smooth and commodious, that it is much better to follow them than to seek a straighter path by climbing over the tops of rocks and descending to the bottoms of precipices.
With a grave appearance of impartiality he declared that as they were now finally committing themselves to Reform or Innovation, it was desirable that they should take one last view of the perimeter of the whole subject, its defects as well as its advantages.
Heart" was intended for a much longer tale, and is unavoidably incomplete; but it is unnecessary to point out defects that even the juvenile reader will soon detect.