deermouse

deermouse

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2005); Perote ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus perotensis; Best and Ceballos, 1995); Perote deermouse (Peromyscus bullatus; Gonzalez-Ruiz and Alvarez-Castaneda, 2005); Nelson's woodrat (N.
An Assessment of Population Abundance and Morphological Abnormalities in the White-footed Deermouse (Peromyscus leucopus).
Other species documented included: Nine-banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus), Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus), 11 species of rodents (Eastern Chipmunk, Tamias striatus; Woodchuck, Marmota monax; Eastern Gray Squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis; Southern Flying Squirrel Glaucomys volans; American Beaver, Castor canadensis; White-footed Deermouse, Peromyscus leucopus; Cotton Deermouse, Peromyscus gossypinus; Hispid Cotton Rat, Sigmodon hispidus; Allegheny Woodrat, Neotoma magister; Woodland Vole, Microtus pinetorum), Domestic Dog (Canis familiaris), Coyote (Canis latrans), Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), Raccoon (Procyon lotor), Eastern Striped Skunk (Mephitis mephitis), Feral Cat (Felis catus), and White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).
Included are the following: the Southeastern shrew, North American least shrew, hoary bat, Rafinesquii's big-eared bat, Southern flying squirrel, meadow jumping mouse, Texas deermouse, and golden mouse.
Mammal species likely to be found in dry prairie in the Grand Calumet River basin are the prairie deermouse, Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii; white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus; prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster; thirteen-lined ground squirrel, Spermophilus tridecemlineatus; woodchuck, Marmota monax; least shrew, Cryptotisparva; Franklin's ground squirrel, Spermnophilus franklinii; southern bog lemming, Synaptomys cooperi; coyote, Can is latrans; red fox, Vulpes vulpes; least weasel, Mustela nivalis; and American badger, Taxidea taxus.
Investigation found that ground zero was a mouse - a rural deermouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, which is a native of most of North America, including the American southwest.
For instance, the white-footed deermouse (Peromyscus leucopus) is the main host for immature stages of this tick and also the main reservoir of B.
Habitat preference of the endemic tawny deermouse (Peromyscus perfulvus), a species of conservation concern.
Species abundance distribution was found to be the greatest for the white-footed deermouse (Peromyscus leucopus).
We performed separate Rayleigh's tests for North American deermouse captured in edge and forested habitats to determine whether direction of movements differed with distance from the right-of-way.
However, one saltcedar grid (saltcedar 1) had a high diversity index due to even numbers of captures of the white-footed deermouse Peromyscus leucopus and the Chihuahuan Desert pocket mouse.