deep posterior compartment

deep posterior compartment

muscular compartment of the lower leg deep to, and separated by fascial tissue from, the superficial muscle compartment, and overlying posterior aspect of interosseous septum between tibia and fibular (see syndrome, compartment) and Figure 1
Figure 1: Compartments of the right lower leg. This article was published in Neale's Disorders of the Foot, Lorimer, French, O'Donnell, Burrow, Wall, Copyright Elsevier, (2006).
References in periodicals archive ?
The precise localization of distal motor branches of the tibial nerve in the deep posterior compartment of the leg.
One evidence in favor of this theory is that the most effective surgical procedures involve release of the deep posterior compartment, including the soleus sling and removal of a strip of posteromedial tibia periosteum (36).
Deep posterior compartment pressure was normal at rest, reaching 20 mmHg after exercise (Table 1).
A repeat fasciectomy of deep posterior compartment was performed, extended to muscle fascia (epimysium) and tibialis posterior muscle.
The anterior compartment is most susceptible to compartment syndrome followed by the deep posterior compartment (McQueen et al 1996b).
Compartment syndrome of the deep posterior compartment also has associations with compartment syndrome of the foot.
Three case series reported on deep posterior compartment fasciotomy to treat MTSS in athletes.
In the deep posterior compartment lie the flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallicus longus, and proximally, the popliteus.
10,17) The anterior compartment is involved in 40% to 60% of patients, the deep posterior compartment in 32% to 60%, the lateral compartment in 12% to 35%, and the superficial posterior compartment in 2% to 20%.
The deep posterior compartment can be tested through a medial approach by placing the needle directly posterior to the tibia.
Care must be taken to identify and release the separate compartment of the tibialis posterior muscle when decompressing the deep posterior compartment.
1,2) While all compartments can be affected in CCS, the ones most commonly involved are the anterior (40% to 70%) and deep posterior compartments (15% to 30%).