deductible


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Related to deductible: Tax deductible

payment

 [pa´ment]
remuneration in exchange for goods or services.
prospective payment payment to a health care facility at a predetermined rate for treatment regardless of the cost of care for a specific individual patient.
third party payment payment of hospital or other health care bills by a source other than the patient; the most common sources are private or governmental insurance. Called also third party reimbursement.

deductible

[dēduk′tibəl]
an amount paid each year by a health insurance plan enrollee before benefits begin. It is not synonymous with copayment.

de·duc·ti·ble

(dĕ-dŭk'ti-bĕl)
The amount for which the insured is responsible before the health care plan pays; amount usually set on an annual basis.
Synonym(s): annual deductible.

de·duc·ti·ble

(dĕ-dŭk'ti-bĕl)
The amount for which the insured is responsible before the health care plan pays; amount usually set on an annual basis.
Synonym(s): annual deductible.

deductible

(diduk´təbəl),
n 1. a stipulated sum the covered person must pay toward the cost of dental treatment before the benefits of the program go into effect. The deductible may be annual or payable only once and may vary in amount from program to program.
n 2. the amount of dental expense for which the beneficiary is responsible before a third party will assume any liability for payment of benefits. Deductible may be an annual or one-time charge and may vary in amount from program to program. See also family deductible.
deductible amount,
n the portion of dental care expense the insured must pay before the plan's benefits begin.
deductible clause,
n a provision in an insurance contract stipulating that the insurer will pay only that amount that is in excess of a specified amount.
References in periodicals archive ?
Question: Business Income Coverage Form, CP 00 30, does not contain a deductible clause.
The creators of the SBC and the brochure seem to assume, as a given, that consumers all understand that, if the deductible is not mentioned in a description of out-of-pocket costs, then the deductible does not apply.
A NEW ANALYSIS POINTS to the difficulty families have paying for the ever-growing cost of health care, especially given increasing deductibles.
The deductible provision in the commercial property forms developed by Insurance Services Office, Inc.
Another problem arises in determining from what amount the deductible should be subtracted.
A 401(k) and a deductible IRA effectively receive the same tax treatment--so which should a client choose?
Adding up payroll deductions for premiums of both plans, plus co-payments, deductibles and tax advantages, he computed saving about $700 annually.
Considering the large number of assumptions underlying the choice of taking a deductible, the importance of this study lies in the overall conclusions rather than specific tables and figures.
Contractual negotiation limitations and fear of increased deductibles have led to their skepticism about the plans.
24411(a) treatment are now generally deductible under Sec.
If the relative precision of the M&E statistical sample is 10 percent or smaller, based on the estimate of the amount of the expenses that are 100-percent deductible but were erroneously classified as subject to the 50-percent limitation, the revenue procedure allows the use of the point estimate rather than the lower limit.
HSAs can only be applied to insurance plans that carry a $1,000 deductible, or a $2,000 deductible for family coverage, and that require you to pay that amount, or more before the insurance kicks in.