deduction

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deduction

 [de-duk´shun]
reasoning in which the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises; reasoning from the general to the particular.

de·duc·tion

(dē-dŭk'shŭn),
The logical derivation of a conclusion from certain premises. The conclusion will be true if the premises are true and the deductive argument is valid. Compare: induction (9).

deduction

Etymology: L, deducere, to lead
a system of reasoning that leads from a known principle to an unknown, or from the general to the specific. Deductive reasoning is used to test diagnostic hypotheses.

de·duc·tion

(dĕ-dŭk'shŭn)
The logical derivation of a conclusion based on certain premises. The conclusion will be true if the premises are true and the deductive argument is valid.
Compare: induction (9)
References in periodicals archive ?
The deductibility of assumed liabilities is important for CPAs because the Internal Revenue Code contains no provision allowing a transferee corporation to deduct assumed liabilities in a section 351 exchange.
As long as you actively participate in the investment and your income is less than $100,000, you may deduct up to $25,000 in real estate related losses.
163(a), a taxpayer can deduct such interest only if he or she is liable for the debt.
Taxpayers can deduct these costs only if they can categorize them as software development costs under section 5 of revenue procedure 2000-50.
Thus, a taxpayer cannot deduct expenses paid on behalf of another, because they are not ordinary and necessary to the taxpayer.
Under the OnePersonPlus plan, she can tax deduct $120,000 each year until she retires in 10 years - that's $80,000 more than the old 401(k) limit.
Thus, these loans did not allow the taxpayers to increase their basis in the borrower corporations, so as to enable them to deduct those corporations' losses.
On the other hand, a shareholder may be able to deduct corporate expenses if the corporation is insolvent and he or she can prove the payment is necessary to continue the business.
G can carry forward the excess $4,000 nondeductible contribution and deduct it in a future year; the carryforward contribution retains its character as 30% property.
Duncan could not deduct any lodging expenditures because he did not have the required proof.
162-25T provides that when compensation is paid in the form of a noncash fringe benefit, an employer may deduct its cost in providing the benefit if the value is included in the employee's gross income.
American Stores responded that in numerous cases the courts allowed a company to deduct expenditures incurred to defend its business and policies.