dedifferentiation

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anaplasia

 [an″ah-pla´zhah]
loss of differentiation of cells and their orientation to each other, a characteristic of tumor cells; called also dedifferentiation and undifferentiation.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn),
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia

dedifferentiation

/de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion/ (de-dif″er-en″she-a´shun) anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

(dē′dĭf-ə-rĕn′shē-ā′shən)
n. Biology
Reversion of a specialized cell or tissue to an unspecialized form. Dedifferentiation may occur before the regeneration of appendages in plants and certain animals and in the development of some cancers.

de′dif·fer·en′ti·ate′ v.

dedifferentiation

See anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

Pathology
The reversion of a cell or cell line to a more embryonic form.
 
Tumour biology
The loss of the cellular features of terminal differentiation, a finding often associated with increased aggressiveness of a neoplasm.

de·dif·fer·en·ti·a·tion

(dē-dif'ĕr-en'shē-ā'shŭn)
1. The return of parts to a more homogeneous state.
2. Synonym(s): anaplasia.

dedifferentiation

a process in which tissues that have undergone CELL DIFFERENTIATION can be made to reverse the process so as to become a primordial cell again (see GURDON). In theory, all cells should possess this ability since the mature cell does not lose DNA (see TOTIPOTENCY), but reversal has been demonstrated in plants much more easily than in animal cells.

dedifferentiation

regression from a more specialized or complex form to a simpler state.