decubitus position


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Related to decubitus position: lateral decubitus position

position

 [pŏ-zish´un]
1. a bodily posture or attitude.
2. the relationship of a given point on the presenting part of the fetus to a designated point of the maternal pelvis; see accompanying table. See also presentation.
Common examination positions. From Lammon et al., 1995.
anatomical position that of the human body standing erect, palms facing forward; it is the position of reference in designating site or direction of structures of the body. The anatomical position for quadrupeds is standing with all four feet on the ground; the difference between animal and human anatomical position leads to confusion among terms indicating position and direction.
The body in the anatomical poisition, showing regions of the body. From Applegate, 2000.
batrachian position a lying position of infants in which the lower limbs are flexed, abducted, and resting on the bed on their outer aspects, resembling the legs of a frog.
Bozeman's position the knee-elbow position with straps used for support.
decubitus position that of the body lying on a horizontal surface, designated according to the aspect of the body touching the surface as dorsal decubitus (on the back), left or right lateral decubitus (on the left or right side), and ventral decubitus (on the anterior surface). In radiology, the patient is placed in either the right or left lateral decubitus position with the beam perpendicular to the long axis of the body.
dorsal recumbent position position of patient on the back, with lower limbs flexed and rotated outward; used in vaginal examination, application of obstetrical forceps, and other procedures. See illustration.
Fowler's position a position in which the head of the patient's bed is raised 30 to 90 degrees above the level, with the knees sometimes also elevated. See illustration.
Low Fowler's.
froglike position batrachian position.
knee-chest position the patient rests on the knees and chest with head is turned to one side, arms extended on the bed, and elbows flexed and resting so that they partially bear the patient's weight; the abdomen remains unsupported, though a small pillow may be placed under the chest. See illustration.
knee-elbow position the patient resting on the knees and elbows with the chest elevated.
lateral position Sims' position.
lithotomy position the patient lies on the back with the legs well separated, thighs acutely flexed on the abdomen, and legs on thighs; stirrups may be used to support the feet and legs. See illustration.
orthopneic position a position assumed to relieve orthopnea (difficulty breathing except when in an upright position); the patient assumes an upright or semivertical position by using pillows to support the head and chest, or sits upright in a chair.
prone position a position with the patient lying face down with arms bent comfortably at the elbow and padded with the armboards positioned forward.
Prone position. From Lammon et al., 1995.
reverse Trendelenburg position a supine position with the patient on a plane inclined with the head higher than the rest of the body and appropriate safety devices such as a footboard.
Rose's position one intended to prevent aspiration or swallowing of blood, as from an injured lip: the patient is supine with head hanging over the end of the table in full extension so as to enable bleeding to be over the margins of the inverted upper incisors.
semi-Fowler position a position similar to Fowler's position but with the head less elevated.
Sims position the patient lies on the left side with the left thigh slightly flexed and the right thigh acutely flexed on the abdomen; the left arm is behind the body with the body inclined forward, and the right arm is positioned according to the patient's comfort. See illustration. Called also lateral position.
Sims recumbent position a variant of the Sims position in which the patient lies on the left side in a modified left lateral position; the upper leg is flexed at hip and knees, the lower leg is straight, and the upper arm rests in a flexed position on the bed.
Trendelenburg's position the patient is on the back on a table or bed whose upper section is inclined 45 degrees so that the head is lower than the rest of the body; the adjustable lower section of the table or bed is bent so that the patient's legs and knees are flexed. There is support to keep the patient from slipping. See illustration.

decubitus position

a position used in producing a radiograph of the chest or abdomen of a patient who is lying down, with the central ray horizontal. The patient may be prone (ventral decubitus), supine (dorsal decubitus), or on the left or right side (left or right lateral decubitus). Also called decubitus projection.

decubitus position

The position of the patient on a flat surface. The exact position is indicated by which surface of the body is closest to the flat surface: in left or right lateral decubitus, the patient is flat on the left or right side, respectively; in dorsal or ventral decubitus, the patient is on the back or abdomen, respectively.
See also: position
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the general recommendation for bed rest in the lateral decubitus position and use of a pelvic girdle for SPD, some women were allowed to be mobile on the 1st day after labor, depending on their symptoms [4,7,13,20,23], and use of a pelvic girdle was discouraged for some women [3,23-25,27].
The patient must be optimally resuscitated, with induction performed in the lateral decubitus position, thus avoiding direct suction of the tonsillar bed.
The pregnant patient should be placed in the left lateral decubitus position, with her right hip elevated, to minimize interference with venous return.
CT scanning in the decubitus position encourages the muscle to bulge forward, providing improved visualisation of the muscle.
Under fluoroscopic monitoring with an image intensifier positioned vertical to the leg to be operated on in the lateral decubitus position (or horizontal in case of neutral decubitus position of the leg), the grid easily permits localization with a single fluoroscopy image of both locking screw holes of the endomedullary nail (Fig.
The most common symptom is chest pain, which is typically precipitated by left lateral decubitus position and relieved by turning to the right (4).