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Dutch Echographic Cardiac Risk Evaluation Applying Stress Echo. A trial that compared the cardioprotective effect of a beta-blocker—bisoprolol—in high-risk patients undergoing major vascular surgery with standard therapy
Results 20 serious cardiac events, cardiac deaths or MIs occurred with standard therapy, 2 with beta-blockers
References in periodicals archive ?
Branson subsidized the first few seasons at the performing arts center, based on a financial plan designed to decreasingly rely on his largesse while the theatre found alternate means of support.
Okay, the supporters DO need to do their bit, given the Anfield atmosphere has, even by the decreasingly intense standards of the Premier League era, hardly offered enthusiastic backing at times.
One has to 'get through' a prescriptive syllabus in a decreasingly shorter time.
The state as a regulator has been decreasingly active, and current laws do not differentiate "between an investor with an activity of a productive nature such as manufacturing, and an activity with an individualistic wealth-accumulating nature, such as financial services", the study pointed out.
Economic decisions, decreasingly a priority for the cabinet, were ultimately relegated to the back burner.
Fewer people are seeking out a news source directly; they stumble across news in social streams that are decreasingly aligned with the interests of news publishers.
Design" is now decreasingly seen as knowledge, skill or ability, and increasingly as a method to curate these.
As they approach the ends of their various 21-day incubation periods, Frieden said, ''it's decreasingly likely any will develop .
JD (U) leader Sharad Yadav said students with a regional language as their mothertongue have been decreasingly successful in the exam even as more and more English-proficient aspirants cleared it.
If it were to fall below the 43 percent attained in 2009, the Council could more plausibly argue that the preferences of a decreasingly interested public can be largely ignored.
Calling for a rethink in how the views of wind turbine opponents are viewed, Dr Harrison said the danger was that at present "we regulate and legislate ourselves into deeper and darker holes where the light of 'feeling' decreasingly fails to shine.