decomposition


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decomposition

 [de-kom″po-zish´un]
1. the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles.
2. deterioration or decay of a substance.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn),
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

decomposition

/de·com·po·si·tion/ (de-kom″pah-zish´un) the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles.

decomposition

(dē-kŏm′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or result of decomposing; disintegration.
2.
a. Chemistry Separation into constituents by chemical reaction.
b. Biology Breakdown or decay of organic materials.

de·com′po·si′tion·al adj.

decomposition

[dē′kəmpəsish′ən]
Etymology: L, de + componere, to put together
the breakdown of a substance into simpler chemical forms. decompose, v.

decomposition

The physical putrefaction and decay of a body, which is slowed by immersion in water (especially cold water) or burial (especially in drier soils).

General sequence of external decomposition
• Discolouration of lower abdominal wall, starting in right iliac fossa.
• Distension of abdomen by gas (spread of bowel organisms).
• Discolouration of dependent areas (generalised spread of bacteria to moistest tissues).
• Face and neck turn red and swell.
• “Marbling” branching pattern on skin due to bacterial colonisation of vessels and staining of vessel walls by haemolysis—occurring at ± 1 week of corpse in ambient temperature of 18–20°C.
• Skin blistering and slippage.
• Gross distension of the abdomen, face (protrusion of tongue and eyes) and scrotum.
• Bloody fluid leaks from orifices (2–3 weeks).
• Skin discolouration deepens to dark green or black.
• Maggot infestation with increased tissue destruction.
• Skin slippage from fingers and toes (hinders identification).

Internal decomposition
Proceeds more slowly, and differs by organ:
• Intestine, adrenals and pancreas autolyse within hours.
• Brain liquefies within a month (meningeal haemorrhage/haematoma usually persist).
• Body fat liquefies to yellow fluid filling body cavities.
• Softer tissues and viscera disintegrate over several months.
• Uterus, heart and prostate persist for the longest.
• Skeletalisation with tendons—12–18 months in temperate climate.
• “Bare-bone” skeletalisation—3 years in temperate climate.

pu·tre·fac·tion

(pyū'trĕ-fak'shŭn)
Decomposition or rotting, the breakdown of organic matter, usually by bacterial action, resulting in the formation of other substances of less complex constitution with the evolution of ammonia or its derivatives and hydrogen sulfide; characterized usually by the presence of toxic or malodorous products.
Synonym(s): decay (2) , decomposition.
[L. putre-facio, pp. -factus, to make rotten]

decomposition

Separation into chemical constituents or simpler compounds often as a result of bacterial enzymatic action.

decomposition

  1. the break-up of a chemical substance into two or more simpler substances.
  2. the breakdown of organic material by microorganisms.

decomposition

decay, disintegration or lysis

decomposition

1. biologically speaking, the separation of compound bodies into their constituent principles; the natural process of biodegradation of animal and plant materials. Its occurrence in human and animal foods is a constant threat and preventing it is the prime objective of the food hygienist.
2. statistically speaking, the removal of accountable influences on a set of data so that only variation due to random error remains.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next Section introduces the basic principle of Local mean decomposition and Singular value dcomposition (SVD).
Primal-dual decomposition can offer also better computational time than traditional decomposition techniques, such as Benders decomposition and Lagrangian Relaxation.
Six litter bags each time (three for the decomposition and three for colonization) were removed at random, respectively in the 1st, 3rd, 7th, 14th, 28th, 56th and 72nd day of the experiment.
It can provide explosive decomposition of AN under the conditions of complicated heat removal.
3 NP-Completeness of some regular graph/multigraph decomposition problems
Keywords: Adomian decomposition method, Neumann boundary conditions, Nonlinear boundary value problem, Bratu problem, Burger problem.
Mettler-Toledo TGA and PerkinElmer power compensated Diamond DSC were used to study the thermal decomposition of minerals, kerogen and raw oil shale samples.
Microbial communities are essential to maintaining soil quality because of their involvement in organic matter dynamics, nutrient cycling, and decomposition [9].
In addition to assessing the decomposition process due to increasing amounts of straw, the effects of two traditional management practices were also evaluated.
The findings of his research can help indicate whether the source of that fingerprint is either due to whole body decomposition or to body fluids such as blood.
At FACTS, people can donate their bodies to science, and if they donate to us, we study the process of decomposition to help law enforcement identify individuals who have died in this region of Texas.