decompensation


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Related to decompensation: cardiac decompensation

decompensation

 [de″kom-pen-sa´shun]
1. any failure of homeostatic mechanisms.
2. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis, and edema.
3. in psychiatry, the failure of defense mechanisms, which results in progressive personality disintegration.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē'kom-pen-sā'shŭn), Avoid substituting this word for deterioration or failure in cases where there has been no previous compensation.
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation

/de·com·pen·sa·tion/ (de″kom-pen-sa´shun)
1. inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation, marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, and edema.
2. in psychiatry, failure of defense mechanisms resulting in progressive personality disintegration.

decompensation

(dē′kŏm-pən-sā′shən)
n.
1. Medicine The inability of a bodily organ or system, especially the circulatory system, to maintain adequate physiological function in the presence of disease.
2. Psychology The inability to maintain defense mechanisms in response to stress, resulting in personality disturbance or psychological imbalance.

de·com′pen·sate′ v.

decompensation

[dē′kəmpənsā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + compensare, to balance
1 the failure of a system, as cardiac decompensation in heart failure.
2 (in psychology) the failure of a defense mechanism.

decompensation

Medtalk An acute exacerbation or worsening of a clinical condition–eg schizophrenia, renal failure, liver failure, which had been held in check by compensatory mechanisms Psychiatry The exacerbation of a mental condition–eg schizophrenia, that occurs when corrective mechanisms cannot maintain the individual at an optimal level of functioning; the deterioration of existing defenses, leading to an exacerbation of pathologic behavior. See Nervous breakdown.

de·com·pen·sa·tion

(dē-kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
1. A failure of compensation in heart disease.
2. The appearance or exacerbation of a mental disorder due to failure of defense mechanisms.

decompensation (dē·kmˈ·pen·sāˑ·shn),

n 1. a persistent (yet reversible, in some cases) pattern of dysfunction, in which homeostatic mechanisms are overwhelmed, either in part or completely.
2. postural pattern in which the musculoskeletal system indicates dysfunctional ad-justments as a result of a physical anomaly, such as shortened leg.

decompensation

Failure of an organ to fulfill its function adequately. Examples: corneal decompensation following years of extended contact lens wear; a failure of the eye movement system to overcome a heterophoria.

decompensation

failure of compensation.

cardiac decompensation
inability of the heart to maintain adequate circulation; it is marked by dyspnea, venous engorgement, cyanosis and edema.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services stated, "Mental decompensation is when symptoms of a mental health disorder begin to be more prominent, and the person is unable to manage or cope with their symptoms.
In treating IVA, the goal is to prevent metabolic decompensation by careful and routine clinical observation and management of the patient.
Moreover, it seems possible that these podocytic changes could play a role in sustaining the increased permeability of the blood-urine barrier in the later stages of diabetic renal decompensation.
In the EU, peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin combination therapy is approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C who have elevated transaminases without liver decompensation and who are positive for serum HCV-RNA or anti-HCV, including naive patients with clinically stable HIV co-infection and in patients who have failed previous treatment with interferon alpha (pegylated or nonpegylated) and ribavirin combination therapy or interferon alpha monotherapy.
would "clinically decompensate" and that "if he was left to his own devices without taking medication, without supervision, clinical decompensation, a potential dangerousness [sic] could happen.
A sustained and/or poorly-managed SSR has the potential to cause adverse consequences in the perioperative period, including pain, cardiac ischemia and hemodynamic instability, renal decompensation, pulmonary decompensation, increased catabolism, impaired immunity, and hypercoagulability syndromes (Lubenow, Ivankovich, & McCarthy, 2001).
Tipranavir co-administered with low-dose ritonavir, has been associated with reports of clinical hepatitis and hepatic decompensation, including some fatalities.
Another more blatant example is one in which a patient's vital signs indicate decompensation, but the clinical response is inadequate or delayed.
This may progress to the point where decompensation is not noticed by staff and results in harm to self or others.
Initial medical and supportive therapies are directed at stabilizing the patient, correcting the hyperthyroid state, managing the systemic decompensation, and treating the underlying cause.
Controlling cognitive symptoms may be based on recognizing triggers to "overloading" and decompensation.
Vital signs documented in the 3-4 hr after the episode showed a clinical decompensation with a respiratory rate of 42-50 breaths/min, a heart rate of 155-180 beats/min, and an initial oxygen saturation of 91% on a 70% face mask.