decoction

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de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn),
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema
[L. decoctio, fr. de-coquo, pp. -coctus, to boil down]

decoction

[dikok′shən]
Etymology: L, de + coquere, to cook
a liquid medicine made from an extract of water-soluble substances, usually with the aid of boiling water. Herbal remedies are usually decoctions. See also concoction.

decoction

Alternative medicine
A herbal medicine preparation in which the substrate (e.g., cinnamon bark, ginger root, nuts, seeds or coarse leaves) is hard or ligneous, making its extraction difficult; decoctions require grinding or pulverisation and then boiling to extract the volatile oil or substance of interest. 

Chinese medicine
A preparation of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs in which the dried herbs are placed in water, boiled until the volume is markedly reduced, and the dregs strained off; it results in virtually complete extraction of the herb’s essence and medicinal potential, as well as rapid absorption and onset of action.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema.

decoction (dē·käkˑ·shn),

n a method of medicine preparation in which herbal roots and stems are boiled in water for several minutes. This increases the efficiency of extraction of medicinal constituents from large, fibrous chunks of herbal material.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining them, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.

decoction

seeping of a substance, usually woody stems, barks, berries, rhizomes and root material, in water to obtain its soluble principles and use as a tea for oral administration. See also infusion (1).
References in periodicals archive ?
Infusions gave better results than decoctions for all of the herbs and storage periods studied.
Ott (1996) and Rivier and Lindgren (1972) argue that most ayahuasca decoctions have subthreshold doses of harmala alkaloids, and that DMT should be considered the primary psychoactive compound in the decoction.
DecoctionsWHEN the healing part of a herb resides primarily in the bark, roots or seeds, the best way to extract the benefit is to prepare a decoction.
These we know are made of decoctions of certain herbs or roots or berries in certain proportions, something which anyone can make once they know the secret.
A Chinese herbal decoction prepared from Radix astragali and Radix angelicae sinensis induces the expression of erythropoietin in cultured Hep3b cells.
The osteogenic effects of different DBT decoctions were also compared (Fig.
However, there is still no systematic review comparing the effectiveness and safety of granules with the more traditional method of herbal decoctions.
The cowberry leaves are dispensed in packages for making decoctions, and used as ingredients of teas including two original formulae developed at the Far-Eastern State Medical University.
DG decoctions have been shown to possess anti-oxidative and vasodilator properties (Lam et al.
Altogether, six decoctions were formulated following the same method of preparation as the individual herbs.
The combination of herbal decoctions and herbal injections showed an advantage over treatments where treatments were used individually.