decoction

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de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn),
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema
[L. decoctio, fr. de-coquo, pp. -coctus, to boil down]

decoction

[dikok′shən]
Etymology: L, de + coquere, to cook
a liquid medicine made from an extract of water-soluble substances, usually with the aid of boiling water. Herbal remedies are usually decoctions. See also concoction.

decoction

Alternative medicine
A herbal medicine preparation in which the substrate (e.g., cinnamon bark, ginger root, nuts, seeds or coarse leaves) is hard or ligneous, making its extraction difficult; decoctions require grinding or pulverisation and then boiling to extract the volatile oil or substance of interest. 

Chinese medicine
A preparation of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs in which the dried herbs are placed in water, boiled until the volume is markedly reduced, and the dregs strained off; it results in virtually complete extraction of the herb’s essence and medicinal potential, as well as rapid absorption and onset of action.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema.

decoction (dē·käkˑ·shn),

n a method of medicine preparation in which herbal roots and stems are boiled in water for several minutes. This increases the efficiency of extraction of medicinal constituents from large, fibrous chunks of herbal material.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining them, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.

decoction

seeping of a substance, usually woody stems, barks, berries, rhizomes and root material, in water to obtain its soluble principles and use as a tea for oral administration. See also infusion (1).
References in periodicals archive ?
A decoction of the stem of the plant Lycium shawii, (41) known asgharqad, is used to purify and detoxify the digestive and circulatory systems.
An herbal decoction of Radix astragali and Radix angelicae sinensis promotes hematopoiesis and thrombopoiesis.
Twenty milliliters of water at 600C was added to one gram each of the powders to prepare a decoction and allowed to cool to room temperature at 250C.
Comparison of effectiveness and safety between granules and decoction of Chinese herbal medicine: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials.
Infusions gave better results than decoctions for all of the herbs and storage periods studied.
The significant levels of use found in this study region for the decoction of the fresh or dry leaves of Citrus aurantium L.
caapi samples and ayahuasca decoctions make generalisations about pharmacokinetics and subjective effects exceedingly difficult, if not impossible.
A decoction made from the bark of a pear tree acts as an analgesic when applied to bruises, sprains and over-used muscles.
The content of anthraquinones was equal in infusions and decoctions, but hypericine dissolves in water very slowly and more of it was found in decoctions than in infusions.
Philp emphasizes that as chemicals capable of inducing change within the body, these herbal decoctions and concentrates; although "natural", does not delegate that the agent's action will follow altogether different or innovative metabolic pathways to produce its effect.
The inner bark is collected in the fall and can be used in infusions, decoctions, cough syrup and tinctures.
Tea made from the pericarp of the fruit is said to cure skin rashes, and decoctions of the roots, bark and flowers are traditionally used to cure sore throats.