decoction


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de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn),
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema
[L. decoctio, fr. de-coquo, pp. -coctus, to boil down]

decoction

[dikok′shən]
Etymology: L, de + coquere, to cook
a liquid medicine made from an extract of water-soluble substances, usually with the aid of boiling water. Herbal remedies are usually decoctions. See also concoction.

decoction

Alternative medicine
A herbal medicine preparation in which the substrate (e.g., cinnamon bark, ginger root, nuts, seeds or coarse leaves) is hard or ligneous, making its extraction difficult; decoctions require grinding or pulverisation and then boiling to extract the volatile oil or substance of interest. 

Chinese medicine
A preparation of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs in which the dried herbs are placed in water, boiled until the volume is markedly reduced, and the dregs strained off; it results in virtually complete extraction of the herb’s essence and medicinal potential, as well as rapid absorption and onset of action.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.
Synonym(s): apozem, apozema.

decoction (dē·käkˑ·shn),

n a method of medicine preparation in which herbal roots and stems are boiled in water for several minutes. This increases the efficiency of extraction of medicinal constituents from large, fibrous chunks of herbal material.

de·coc·tion

(dē-kok'shŭn)
1. The process of boiling.
2. The pharmacopeial name for preparations made by boiling crude vegetable drugs, and then straining them, in the proportion of 50 g of the drug to 1000 mL of water.

decoction

seeping of a substance, usually woody stems, barks, berries, rhizomes and root material, in water to obtain its soluble principles and use as a tea for oral administration. See also infusion (1).
References in periodicals archive ?
Sijunzi decoction helps in regulating of a variety of immune factors and improves the nutritional status.
Wjgg Tamaricaceae Tamarix africana aarich Family name Local use Amaranthaceae Decoction of aerial parts is used against typhoid and gastrointestinal pain.
The statistical results show that as compared to the positive control, the crude ethanolic extract, ethyl acetate, decoction, fresh, and control (DMSO) are significantly the same showing significant values greater than 0.
Most plants are used as infusions, decoctions, pastes, or inhalants.
To compare the chemical constituents of yacon leaves with their tea infusion, we found that the content of enhydrin in the decoction was substantially decreased compared to that in the tea infusion (Fig.
Tong, "Effect of didang decoction medicated early to type 2 diabetic rats on serum CD68 and MCP-1 level and E-selectin expression," Chinese Journal of Basic Medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol.
For the samples of decoction dilutions, distilled water was used as a blank.
sup][19],[20] Xingshentongqiao decoction (XSTQ), a significantly effective traditional Chinese medicine preparation for narcolepsy, is intended to correct the basic pathogenesis of the imbalance of yin and yang for narcolepsy, and this preparation uses herbs that have been proven to have obvious effects targeting the signaling pathways of HCRT.
It may not be made with a decoction mash, but it might as well be .
Acacia nilotica###fruit dried fruit powder fibers gum###extracts decoction
Ayahuasca, a botanical decoction used by South American healers and shamans, has been credited with curing some types of cancer in a few medical case reports.
An infusion or a decoction of the fresh leaves is a bitter vegetable tonic and alterative, especially in chronic malarial fevers because of its action on the liver.