decibel


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decibel

 [des´ĭ-bel]
a unit of relative power intensity equal to one tenth of a bel, used for electric or acoustic power measurements; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect and an increase of 10 decibels approximately doubles the loudness of a sound. Abbreviated dB or db.
 Examples of decibel levels in everyday situations. From Frazier et al., 1996.

dec·i·bel (dB, db),

(des'i-bel), Avoid the mispronunciation des'i-b'l.
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative intensity of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

/dec·i·bel/ (des´ĭ-bel) a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect.

decibel (dB)

[des′əbəl]
Etymology: L, decimus, one tenth, bel, Alexander G. Bell, Canadian inventor, 1847-1922
a unit of measure of the intensity of sound. A decibel is one tenth of 1 bel (B); an increase of 1 B is perceived as a 10-fold increase in loudness, based on a sound-pressure reference level of 0.0002 dyne/cm2, or 20 micropascals.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel; unit for expressing the relative loudness of sound on a logarithmic scale.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel

A logarithmic unit of comparison between a standard power level and an observed level. The decibel is not a unit of sound intensity but is widely used to compare a noise level with a very low standard reference level near the limit of audibility, and to compare electrical power levels. A tenth of a bel.

Decibel

A unit of measure for expressing the loudness of a sound. Normal speech is typically spoken in the range of about 20-50 decibels.
Mentioned in: Audiometry, Hearing Loss

decibel (dB)

1. Unit used for the measurement of the intensity of a sound. 2. Light intensities are often presented on a logarithmic (rather than linear) scale. This is done, in particular, to abbreviate large numbers. Moreover, it has become common, especially in perimetry, to use decibels rather than log units. A decibel scale is a logarithmic scale where 10 decibels are equal to 1 log unit; 20 decibels, to 2 log units, etc. In perimetry, decibels are used to indicate the attenuation of brightness of the stimulus. Thus, a 20 dB stimulus is equal to one-tenth the brightness of a 10 dB stimulus.

dec·i·bel

(dB) (des'i-bĕl)
One tenth of a bel.
[L. decimus, tenth, + bel]

decibel (des´ibel),

n a logarithmic ratio unit that indicates by what proportion one intensity level differs from another.

decibel

a unit used to express the ratio of two powers, usually electric or acoustic powers, equal to one-tenth of a bel; one decibel equals approximately the smallest difference in acoustic power the human ear can detect. Abbreviated dB or db. See also bel.
References in periodicals archive ?
THROUGHOUT the correspondence about the Godiva Festival music, the decibel levels are frequently referred to.
THE DECIBEL Fanchants set up decibel meters at every Premier League club on three separate occasions throughout 2010/11 - and took an average measurement.
The NIDCD warns that regular exposure of more than one minute to 110 decibels risks permanent hearing loss and recommends no more than 15 minutes of unprotected exposure to 100 decibels.
RNID chief Brian Lamb is calling on manufacturers to include clear on-pack warnings and to link volume levels to decibels so music fans know when they've reached a damaging volume and can take action to protect their hearing.
The bells will be lowered to about 90 decibels, from 98, during spring break.
Under the new rule, the criteria will record 10-decibel shifts from the employee's initial hearing test when they also result in an overall hearing level of 25 decibels.
The Williams sisters - Venus and Serena-have had their grunts recorded at 90 decibels, while Maria Sharapova gives a 103-decibel squeal.
Indeed, the decibel level at which they claim the ears can begin to suffer pain is 125 - which is roughly equivalent to standing four feet from apneumatic drill.
8 decibel reading, also the highest reading we got at the Washington State game, from the crowded aisle between sections 7 and 8 as students roared for the Oregon defense on a third-down possession by USC.