decease


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decease

(dĭ-sēs′)
intr.v. de·ceased, de·ceasing, de·ceases
To die.
n.
The act of dying; death.
References in classic literature ?
By some fraud, it was abstracted immediately after his decease, and the other--the only will found--was proved and administered.
This person, who, as Jones likewise knew, lived in Bond-street, was the widow of a clergyman, and was left by him, at his decease, in possession of two daughters, and of a compleat set of manuscript sermons.
I explained to her the object of a marriage-settlement, and then told her exactly what her prospects were--in the first place, on her coming of age, and in the second place, on the decease of her uncle--marking the distinction between the property in which she had a life-interest only, and the property which was left at her own control.
In this career he met with great success, and would certainly have married an heiress in the end, but for an unlucky check which led to his premature decease.
Miss Miggs attending at the time appointed, was instantly chosen and selected from one hundred and twenty-four competitors, and at once promoted to the office; which she held until her decease, more than thirty years afterwards, remaining single all that time.
Thus, when he died, at twenty-four (the scene of his decease, Calais, and the cause, brandy), he did not leave his widow, from whom he had been separated soon after the honeymoon, in affluent circumstances.
This gloomy prospect of the confusion that would ensue on her decease was very affecting to Mrs.
Filled with this affectionate and touching sorrow, he had solemnly confided her to his son Sampson as an invaluable auxiliary; and from the old gentleman's decease to the period of which we treat, Miss Sally Brass had been the prop and pillar of his business.