decay

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Related to decays: radioactive decay

decay

 [de-ka´]
1. the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter.
2. the process or stage of decline, as in old age.
tooth decay dental caries.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā'),
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
See also: memory.
2.
See also: memory. Synonym(s): putrefaction
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
See also: memory.
4. In dentistry, caries.
See also: memory.
5. psychology loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory.
6. Loss of radioactivity with time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay

/de·cay/ (de-ka´)
1. the decomposition of dead matter.
2. the process of decline, as in aging.

beta decay  disintegration of the nucleus of an unstable radionuclide in which the mass number is unchanged, but atomic number is changed by 1, as a result of emission of a negatively or positively charged (beta) particle.
tooth decay  dental caries.

decay

(dĭ-kā′)
v. de·cayed, de·caying, de·cays
v.intr.
1. Biology To break down into component parts; rot.
2. Physics To disintegrate in a process of radioactive decay or particle decay.
3. Electronics To decrease gradually in magnitude. Used of voltage or current.
4. To decline in health or vigor; waste away.
n.
1.
a. The destruction or decomposition of organic matter as a result of bacterial or fungal action; rot.
b. Rotted matter.
2. Physics
a. See radioactive decay.
b. See particle decay.

de·cay′er n.

decay

[dikā′]
1 a gradual deterioration that accompanies the end of life.
2 a gradual deterioration, usually caused by bacteria and other decomposers, of the body of an organism after death.
3 the process of disintegration of a radioactive substance.

decay

Dentistry Caries, see there Medtalk Putrefaction, see there.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
2. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
3. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
4. dentistry Caries.
5. psychology Loss of information registered by the senses and processed into short-term memory.
See also: memory
6. Loss of radioactivity over time; spontaneous emission of radiation or charged particles or both from an unstable nucleus.
7. Synonym(s): disintegration.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay

see BIODEGRADATION.

decay

the decomposition of dead tissue, mainly by the action of fungi and bacteria.

de·cay

(dĕ-kā')
1. In dentistry, caries.
2. Destruction of an organic substance by slow combustion or gradual oxidation.
3. Synonym(s): putrefaction.
4. To deteriorate; to undergo slow combustion or putrefaction.
[L. de, down, + cado, to fall]

decay,

v to decompose.
decay, dental,
n See caries.
decay product,
n See daughter.
decay, radioactive,
n the disintegration of the nucleus of an unstable nuclide by the spontaneous emission of charged particles and/or photons.
decay, senile,

decay

1. the gradual decomposition of dead organic matter.
2. the process or stage of decline, as in old age.
3. in radioactivity terminology the disintegration of the nucleus of an inactive nuclide by the spontaneous emission of alpha or beta particles. Called also radioactive disintegration. Substances produced by the disintegrations are called daughter (3) compounds.

decay-accelerating factor
a membrane-associated protein found on many cells, including peripheral blood cells, that inhibits the activity of complement.

Patient discussion about decay

Q. what would be the best way to protect my teeth from decaying?i fill pain always in my private parties,what prb whenever i take long with out sex,so i would like the advice from my fewwol

A. i fail to see the connection between teeth and groin pain...about the teeth. it's very very simple- get used to a healthy oral hygiene. brush your teeth in the right way twice a day for at least 6 minute. use floss. go to a dental hygienist, she'll guide you through it.

Q. Whether it`s possible for Bipolar disorder in children?

A. It is possible for children to suffer with bipolar disorder. It is a tricky diagnosis in children I would strongly suggest professional help when dealing with children with bipolar disorder.
I wouldnt trust the diagnosis of a GP, I would suggest getting a referal to a pediatric psychiatrist for a through evaluation and proper treatment

More discussions about decay
References in periodicals archive ?
If these particles exist, they will appear as virtual particles in quantum loops, where they can affect the rate and angular distributions of particle decays.
Research shows tooth decay varies in different parts of Wales.
89 nm fluence fixed), varying the length of time we observe neutron decays, ramping the magnetic field to remove marginally trapped neutrons, and numerous tests of the electronics and data acquisition systems (DAQ).
Radioactive beryllium-7 atoms locked inside molecular cages decay extraordinarily quickly, Japanese researchers have found.
When a quantity decreases by a fixed fraction--here 1/2--it's known as exponential decay.
Although approximately 20 percent of the poles contained some evidence of visible decay prior to treatment, only one decay fungus was isolated from these poles.
When a neutron decays in the trap, the emitted [beta] spirals around field lines.
The study of B decays is really the study of new physics," he says.
This article describes measurements of angular-correlation coefficients in the decay of free neutrons with the superconducting spectrometer PERKEO II.
One explanation for the extra instances of the decays may lie in an alternative theory called supersymmetry, which posits yet-undiscovered particles that could account for the disintegrations.
ud] determination from neutron [beta]-decay and from high quark generation decay.
Researchers didn't have to wait anywhere near that long to detect the tell-tale alpha decays because the huge number of bismuth atoms in even a single bite-size bolometer crystal guarantees that some atoms will break down in a matter of days, if they break down at all, de Marcillac says.