decay product


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decay product

Etymology: L, de + cadere, to fall, producere, to produce
a stable or radioactive nuclide formed by the disintegration of a radionuclide, either directly or as a result of successive transformation in a radioactive series. Also called daughter product.

decay product

An isotope formed during the decay of a radioactive material. Synonym: daughter product
References in periodicals archive ?
Using a mass spectrometer, the researchers examined with unprecedented precision the amount of the decay product neodymium-142 relative to a stable form of neodymium in the rock.
Some NORM sources, however, might increase the risk of cancer -- especially among workers who inadvertently inhale large amounts of radon decay products or who experience direct, long-term gamma-radiation exposure.
NTP's world-class expertise in medical radioisotope production using the SAFARI-1 reactor and sophisticated processing facilities are Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) - decay product Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) - used to diagnose cancer, heart and numerous other diseases and Iodine-131 (I-131) used in the treatment of thyroid ailments.
Urban Decay later pulled back on its plans and released the following statement: "After careful consideration of many issues, we have decided not to start selling Urban Decay products in China.
Exposed to heat and steam the alloy releases hydrogen as well as the decay products of uranium.
There was heavy rain in the days after the explosion which washed radioactive decay products - mostly caesium 137 - out of clouds and on to fields.
These darkened spherical areas in minerals are due to damage induced by alpha particles from radioactive decay products of uranium and thorium, most notably from polonium.
We have designed an experiment to maximize the solid angle for detection of all decay products (apart from the antineutrino) and to reduce the probability of correlated background events.
Even their enormous mass, though, must eventually dissipate into thermal radiation, photons, and other decay products.