decay product


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decay product

Etymology: L, de + cadere, to fall, producere, to produce
a stable or radioactive nuclide formed by the disintegration of a radionuclide, either directly or as a result of successive transformation in a radioactive series. Also called daughter product.

decay product

An isotope formed during the decay of a radioactive material. Synonym: daughter product
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of radon radiation and its progeny is easily absorbed by human's skin surface, therefore human's inner irradiance is the most important, that is the irradiance due to inhaled radon decay products in the organism (Hess et al.
They measured an increase in the decay products [sup.
We have designed an experiment to maximize the solid angle for detection of all decay products (apart from the antineutrino) and to reduce the probability of correlated background events.
But the Commission notes that other substances have been identified as causes of occupational cancer - such as solar radiation, passive smoke, crystalline silica, diesel exhaust, radon decay products and wood dust.
Even their enormous mass, though, must eventually dissipate into thermal radiation, photons, and other decay products.
The uncertainty stems from the array of expected decay products found in the electrode material that masked the presence of other trace isotopes.
This (Case Western Reserve University) research investigates the dose-response relationship with regard to the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products.
One NRC committee study [Health Effects of Exposure to Radon (BEIR VI, February 1998] revisited the data on lung cancer associated with exposure to radon and its decay products.
Urban Decay is an unconventional cosmetic line uniquely inspired by the light and shade of the urban experience and hits Rackhams, Birmingham at the end of October - we have 25 prizes of pounds 20's worth of Urban Decay products to give away.
These two long-lived radionuclides (half-lives: 32,000 years and 75,000 years) are the decay products of two natural isotopes of uranium dissolved in seawater.