decalcification


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decalcification

 [de-kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
1. the process of removing calcareous matter.
2. the loss of calcium salts from bones or teeth.

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē'kal-si-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Removal of lime or calcium salts, chiefly tricalcium phosphate, from bones and teeth, either in vitro or in vivo as a result of a pathologic process.
2. Precipitation of calcium from blood as by oxalate or fluoride, or the conversion of blood calcium to an un-ionized form as by citrate, thus preventing or delaying coagulation.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification

/de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion/ (de-kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun)
1. loss of calcium salts from a bone or tooth.
2. the process of removing calcareous matter.

decalcification

[dēkal′sifikā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + calyx, lime, facere, to make
loss of calcium salts from the teeth and bones caused by malnutrition, malabsorption, or other dietary or physiological factors, such as immobility. It may result, particularly in older people, from a diet that lacks adequate calcium. Malabsorption may be caused by a lack of vitamin D necessary for the absorption of calcium from the intestine; an excess of dietary fats that can combine with calcium to form an indigestible soaplike compound; the presence of oxalic acid, which can combine with calcium to form a relatively insoluble calcium oxalate salt; hormonal changes of menopause; or a relative lack of acid in the digestive tract, which can decrease the solubility of calcium. Other factors include the parathyroid hormone control of the calcium level in the bloodstream, the ratio of calcium to phosphorus in the blood, and the relative activity of osteoblast cells that form calcium deposits in the bones and teeth and osteoclast cells that absorb calcium from bones and teeth. Bone tissue tends to be maintained in quantities no greater than needed to meet current physical stress. Therefore inactive and, particularly, bedridden people lose calcium from their bones; osteoclastic activity exceeds osteoblastic activity, and decalcification occurs. See also calcium, mineral.

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē-kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Removal of calcium salts from bones and teeth, either in vitro or as a result of a pathologic process.
2. Precipitation of calcium from blood as by oxalate or fluoride, or the conversion of blood calcium to an un-ionized form as by citrate, thus preventing or delaying coagulation.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification

Loss of calcium and other mineral salts from the normally mineralized tissues, bone and teeth. This occurs in OSTEOMALACIA and in OSTEOPOROSIS.

decalcification

pathological removal of calcium salts from bones

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē-kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Removal of calcium salts from bones and teeth.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification (dēkal´sifikā´shən),

n an older term for the loss or removal of calcium salts from calcified tissues. Newer term is
demineralization.

decalcification

1. the process of removing calcareous matter.
2. the loss of calcium salts from bone or teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest grade parts of these new zones are associated with strong decalcification and commonly contain stibnite.
The DC412TTC Drip Coffee Maker has features similar to those on the DC312TTC, along with a permanent gold-tome filter and a decalcification warning that indicates when cleaning is required.
Production of these acids leads to a drop in pH at the tooth surface with subsequent decalcification and potential damage of the tooth enamel.
The primary feather follicles and associated periosteum were embedded in paraffin without decalcification, cut into 5-[micro]m sections and stained with hematoxylin and eosin.
3]) after decalcification, thin sectioning (14 [micro]m), and staining (toluidine blue) using the method described by Dietz et al.
Time to decalcification varied with the size of the bone and the strength of the solution, usually between 12 and 36 hours.
Tissue samples may also be studied through the process of dehydration, mounting, fixation sectioning, and decalcification and micro incineration.
Others have proposed that an inflammatory process leads to a hyperemic state in the paravertebral tissues, causing a progressive decalcification of C1 and C2, and a subsequent weakening of the ligamentous insertions of the transverse ligament onto C1.
Comes with a specially designed Claris water filter to protect against limescale, adjustable-height coffee spout, heated cup-warming tray, integrated rinsing and decalcification program, and programmable coffee temperature control.
Von Recklinghausen (1) first noted disturbed bone and mineral metabolism secondary to hyperthyroidism when he reported the anatomic finding of decalcification of thyrotoxic origin in a 23-year-old woman in 1891.
There might be signs of decalcification, enamel erosion, and discoloration of their teeth, all of which are the product of vomiting.