decalcification


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decalcification

 [de-kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
1. the process of removing calcareous matter.
2. the loss of calcium salts from bones or teeth.

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē'kal-si-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Removal of lime or calcium salts, chiefly tricalcium phosphate, from bones and teeth, either in vitro or in vivo as a result of a pathologic process.
2. Precipitation of calcium from blood as by oxalate or fluoride, or the conversion of blood calcium to an un-ionized form as by citrate, thus preventing or delaying coagulation.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification

/de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion/ (de-kal″sĭ-fĭ-ka´shun)
1. loss of calcium salts from a bone or tooth.
2. the process of removing calcareous matter.

decalcification

[dēkal′sifikā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + calyx, lime, facere, to make
loss of calcium salts from the teeth and bones caused by malnutrition, malabsorption, or other dietary or physiological factors, such as immobility. It may result, particularly in older people, from a diet that lacks adequate calcium. Malabsorption may be caused by a lack of vitamin D necessary for the absorption of calcium from the intestine; an excess of dietary fats that can combine with calcium to form an indigestible soaplike compound; the presence of oxalic acid, which can combine with calcium to form a relatively insoluble calcium oxalate salt; hormonal changes of menopause; or a relative lack of acid in the digestive tract, which can decrease the solubility of calcium. Other factors include the parathyroid hormone control of the calcium level in the bloodstream, the ratio of calcium to phosphorus in the blood, and the relative activity of osteoblast cells that form calcium deposits in the bones and teeth and osteoclast cells that absorb calcium from bones and teeth. Bone tissue tends to be maintained in quantities no greater than needed to meet current physical stress. Therefore inactive and, particularly, bedridden people lose calcium from their bones; osteoclastic activity exceeds osteoblastic activity, and decalcification occurs. See also calcium, mineral.

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē-kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Removal of calcium salts from bones and teeth, either in vitro or as a result of a pathologic process.
2. Precipitation of calcium from blood as by oxalate or fluoride, or the conversion of blood calcium to an un-ionized form as by citrate, thus preventing or delaying coagulation.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification

Loss of calcium and other mineral salts from the normally mineralized tissues, bone and teeth. This occurs in OSTEOMALACIA and in OSTEOPOROSIS.

decalcification

pathological removal of calcium salts from bones

de·cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(dē-kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Removal of calcium salts from bones and teeth.
[L. de-, away, + calx (calc-), lime, + facio, to make]

decalcification (dēkal´sifikā´shən),

n an older term for the loss or removal of calcium salts from calcified tissues. Newer term is
demineralization.

decalcification

1. the process of removing calcareous matter.
2. the loss of calcium salts from bone or teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the manual decalcification procedure, the solution was changed once in 3 days and the pH and temperature were recorded on a daily basis.
Decalcification of bone marrow biopsies should be carried out by reagents which allow the biopsy specimen to be used for further studies, if required.
However, generalised decalcification was still evident, particularly affecting the anterior teeth.
Enamel decalcification is one of the complications of orthodontic treatment.
Decalcification may have an effect on the availability and nature of eluvial materials, but the distribution of pedofeatures in the studied profiles provides no indication for this.
Vitamin K2 appears to assist in the decalcification of hard plaque formations.
Alteration encountered in the hole includes: decalcification, calcite-filled solution cavities, remobilized carbon vein fillings and commonly intense oxidation to hematite and goethite.
This process provides a possible mechanism for the formation of a mineral-dense surface layer in a caries lesion and for other pathological decalcification and calcification processes in biological systems.
Live material is being examined using light microscopy after decalcification with 5%o EDTA.
The caries exam consisted of evaluation of all present teeth for caries status and decalcification lesions, previous restorations and missing teeth due to carious involment.
Lemon glycerine swab sticks can cause irritation and decalcification of teeth.
The native aortic valve was heavily calcified and its decalcification was strenuous.