debrief

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debrief

(dē-brēf′)
tr.v. de·briefed, de·briefing, de·briefs
To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

debrief

(de?bref')
To question carefully and thoroughly a person, crew, or staff after completion of an operation in order to find out how successful the operation was and how to improve future operations. debriefing (?bref'ing)
See: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
Some reports written by detectives after debriefing sessions noted whether a prisoner attended mosque, celebrated Muslim holidays or had made a pilgrimage to Mecca.
Certainly, those mental health professionals who are involved in disaster relief efforts should be working in teams and giving and receiving regular debriefings.
The Central Scotland force took over that role the following day and the first debriefing sessions were held four days later.
Examining Pediatric Resuscitation Education Using Simulation and Scripted Debriefing," JAMA Pediatrics, published online April 22, 2013.
Medicine Task Force, there are few studies that support the reception of ethics debriefing sessions in critical care settings.
Spall reported research on operational models used for peer debriefing by dissertation students.
According to organizations that have used it, critical incident debriefing can produce significant psychological and financial benefits.
It includes 4 EAP counselors and 86 peer support personnel, who receive specialized training in crisis intervention and critical incident debriefings.
This information is combined and compared with norms from the CCL database for later use in the debriefing process.
In preparing for the game, I have invited colleagues to visit our class to serve as bankers when running more than one game or as non-participant observer to assist with taking notes to use for debriefing.
Resiliency management is similar to the CISD, but it eliminates components of traditional debriefings, such as reliving graphic details and pathologizing, and replaces them with approaches designed to encourage natural recovery mechanisms and relationships of support.
The formal and often informal exchanges, including debriefings, story telling, and listening, appeared to provide the buffer many of those volunteers and professionals needed to ward off compassion fatigue and an otherwise growing ineffectiveness at a time of peak demand, several leaders involved in the response said.