debrief

(redirected from debriefers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

debrief

(dē-brēf′)
tr.v. de·briefed, de·briefing, de·briefs
To meet with (one who has undergone a traumatic or stressful experience), especially for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

debrief

(de?bref')
To question carefully and thoroughly a person, crew, or staff after completion of an operation in order to find out how successful the operation was and how to improve future operations. debriefing (?bref'ing)
See: brief
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past 27 years, DSDC has produced 5,000 debriefers, all the while enjoying a reputation of professionalism and responsiveness to the intelligence community.
If the agency held pre-award discussions during the acquisition, the debriefers should comment on the same deficiencies and weaknesses with the offeror that were disclosed during discussions, Under FAR 15.
How did the characteristics of the debriefers balance the skills or values of the student researcher?
Third, by warning participants of the kinds of reactions that could develop over the coming weeks, debriefers might inadvertently prime victims to interpret otherwise normal reactions as pathological or as the beginning stages of PTSD.
Libi underwent debriefs for several weeks and may have described scenarios to the debriefers that he knew will retain their interest.
To ensure credibility, feedback was solicited from six peer debriefers who are experienced qualitative researchers and are familiar with African American men's issues.
Transcriptions were independently coded by the lead investigator and two peer debriefers.
Specifically, GSA schedules used to procure strategic debriefers, interrogators, counterintelligence agents, and intelligence analysts for work in Iraq were classified as "engineering" and "information technology services.
This article grew from our experiences as peer debriefers for each other's qualitative research study to enhance validity and rigor (Padgett, 1998b).
The themes and the follow-up questions were shared with the rest of the research team members (one professor, one boundary spanner), who acted as peer debriefers.
From identifying good questioning techniques and how to avoid the wrong questions to controlling conversations and gaining expertise, this comes from a strategic debriefer who has been training other interrogators and debriefers, and who here offers special skills and focus not commonly addressed.
The researcher was cognizant of this throughout the process and used peer debriefers and an inquiry auditor, all of whom had no direct experience with the program or the students, to review analyses and documents for hidden assumptions and biases.